Project Updates

Liberia Agency For Community Development (LACE)

Disclosure Notice of Project Environmental and Social Management Framework (ESMF) and Resettlement Policy Framework (RPF)

The Government of Liberia is preparing Additional Financing for the Youth Opportunities Project (YOP). Activities under the parent project (Components 1B and 2A) had triggered OP/BP 4.01 (Environmental Assessment) and OP/BP 4.12 (Involuntary Resettlement). An ESMF and an RPF were consequently prepared and disclosed to meet the requirements of the triggered policies.




The safeguards instruments for the parent project will be disclosed for the Additional Financing. The Additional Financing is for cost overrun therefore no update to the parent project ESMF and RPF was required. The instruments provide procedures to ensure that proposed investments under the Additional Financing are properly screened for potential environmental and social risks and impacts, and appropriate site-specific instruments prepared if required.




The disclosed safeguards instruments can be accessed from LACE’s website at http://laceonline.org or the Ministry of Youth and Sports’ website at Http://www.moys.gov.lr. Copies are also available at LACE’s central office:



Mr. Quiwu Yeke
Executive Director
Liberia Agency for Community Empowerment (LACE)
Executive Mansion Grounds
Capitol Hill
Monrovia, Liberia

or

Ministry of Youth and Sports
SKD Sports Stadium
Paynesville, Liberia
Contact:
Tel: 0776603326/0770338950
Email: isdoe86@gmail.com/jbengu@gmail.com

 

 REPUBLIC OF LIBERIA

          LIBERIA AGENCY FOR COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT
(LACE)

 

Youth Opportunities Project (YOP)

Resettlement Policy Framework (RPF)

February 25, 2015 (Updated, December 2018)

(for both Parent and Additional Financing Project)

Contents

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. v

1       INTRODUCTION. 1

1.1       Background. 1

1.2       Description of YOP Project’s components. 1

1.2.1       Component 1: Pre-Employment Social Support and Household Enterprises for Urban Youth  1

1.2.2       Component 2.  Productive Public Works and Life Skills Support for Rural Youth. 4

1.2.3       Component 3: Capacity and Systems Building for Cash Transfers. 6

1.2.4       Component 4 Project Implementation and Coordination. 7

2       PRINCIPLES, RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES OF THE RPF. 9

2.1       Rationale for Preparing RPF. 9

2.2       Objectives of the RPF. 9

2.3       Resettlement Policy Framework Principles. 9

3       Legal Framework. 11

3.1       Policy Framework. 11

3.1.1       World Bank OP 4.12- Involuntary Resettlement 11

3.2       Regulatory Framework. 11

3.2.1       Draft Land Rights Policy, May 2013. 11

3.2.2       3.2.2 Land Rights Act 2018. 11

3.2.3       Liberian Constitution 1986. 12

3.2.4       Land Act 1856. 12

3.2.5       County Act 1969. 12

3.2.6       Land Acquisition Act 1929. 12

3.3       Institutional Framework for implementing Resettlement Action Plans. 13

3.3.1       Liberia Agency for Community Empowerment (LACE) 13

3.3.2       Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 13

3.3.3       Ministry of Youth and Sports (MOYS) 13

3.3.4       Ministry of Public Works (MOPW) 13

3.3.5       Ministry of Agriculture. 14

3.3.6       Local Government Authorities (LGA) 14

3.3.7       Local NGOs. 14

3.4       Land Tenure System.. 14

3.4.1       Customary Tenure. 14

3.4.2       Freehold Tenure. 14

3.4.3       Leasehold Tenure. 14

3.4.4       Land Valuation System.. 15

3.5       Compensation. 15

3.6       World Bank Safeguard Policies on Involuntary Resettlement 15

3.7       Compensation of National and International Practices. 16

4       DESCRIPTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONDITIONS. 19

4.1       General 19

4.1.1       Administrative Structure and Population. 19

4.1.2       Physical Description. 19

4.1.3       Socio- Economic Profile. 20

4.1.4       Land Use. 20

5       VALUATIONS, ELIGIBILITY AND ENTITLEMENTS. 22

5.1       Principles and Objectives. 22

5.1.1       Minimization of Displacement 23

5.1.2       Fair and Adequate Compensation. 24

5.1.3       Compensation Payment 24

5.1.4       Vulnerable Groups. 24

5.1.5       Assistance to Vulnerable Persons. 24

5.2       Valuation of Assets. 25

5.3       Eligibility Criteria. 25

5.4       Method to Determine the Cut – Off Dates. 26

5.5       Entitlements. 26

6       RESETTLEMENT GRIEVANCE REDRESS MECHANISMS. 24

6.1       Potential Grievances/ Disputes. 24

6.2       Proposed Grievance Redress Mechanism.. 24

6.2.1       Overview. 24

6.2.2       Receipts and Registration of Complaints. 25

6.2.3       Determining and Implementing the Redress Action. 25

6.2.4       Verifying the Redress Action. 25

6.2.5       Amicable Mediation and Settlement 25

6.3       Appeal to Court 25

7       BUDGET AND FUNDING ARRANGEMENTS. 26

7.1       BUDGETING. 26

7.2       Funding Sources, Payment Methods and Entitlements. 26

7.3       Consultation on Payment Methods. 26

7.4       CONSULTATION AND PARTICIPATION. 26

8       MONITORING AND EVALUATION. 28

8.1       Internal Monitoring. 28

8.2       External Monitoring. 28

8.3       Completion Audit 28

9       INFORMATION DISCLOSURE. 29

10         LIST OF ANNEXES. 30

List of Tables

Table 3.1: Comparison between Liberian Regulations and World Bank Policies 13

Table 5.1: General guidelines and methods for costs preparation       20

Table 5.2: Eligibility Criteria                                                                         21

Table 5.3: Entitlement Matrix                                                                       22

List of Figures

Figure 4.1: Map of Liberia                                                                           16

List of Annexes

Annex 1:      World Bank Policy on Involuntary Resettlement (OP 4.12)     32

Annex 2:      RAP Outline                                                                              38

Annex 3:      Grievance Form (GF)                                                              42

Annex 4:      Grievance Redress Form (GRF)                                            43

Annex 5:      Summary of Safeguard Consultations

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Background

This Resettlement Policy Framework (RPF) has been updated in compliance with the World Bank (WB) policy requirements on projects involving land acquisition and involuntary Resettlement (OP4.12).  The RPF primarily provides the regulatory framework for managing the risks of land acquisition, restriction of access to land and natural resources, and involuntary resettlement during the implementation of the Liberia Youth Opportunities Project (YOP).

The Resettlement Policy Framework (RPF) covers the following themes:

  • Project Description
  • Operational Procedures
  • Legal Framework
  • Institutional Framework
  • Valuation, Eligibility and Entitlement Procedures
  • Sources of Funding
  • Consultation and Participation
  • Grievance Redress
  • Monitoring and Evaluation and
  • Disclosure of Social Safeguards Instruments

Operational Procedures

The Sub-projects to  be  undertaken  under sub components 1B (Household Enterprises) and 2A(Productive Public Works and Life Skills Support) of the YOP project  may  involve  land use implications and may  trigger  the  World  Bank  Safeguards  Policy  on Involuntary Resettlement (OP/ BP 4.12).   Tis RPF applies to any Sub-project which may have implications of loss of assets or access to assets important to production, the loss of income sources or means of livelihood.

Legal Framework

The World Bank’s safeguards policies operate to prevent and mitigate potential adverse impacts associated with the Bank’s lending operation to people and their environment.  The GoL Land Rights Policy defines Public Land, Government Land, Customary Land and Private Land as well as Protected Areas that will be conserved for the benefits of all Liberians.

Institutional Framework; Preparation of RAPS

The institutional framework for the implementation of the RPF will involve government ministries and agencies as well as private institutions but the overall responsibility would be that of the LACE.

The Resettlement Policy Framework will ensure that where land acquisition is unavoidable, all project affected persons (PAPs) will be compensated for their lost assets at full replacement costs, and in the event of resettlement be provided with supplementary assistance to help them improve, or at least restore, their livelihoods and standards of living to pre-displacement levels.  In all cases after the compensation or resettlement has taken place the PAPs will not be “no worse-off if not better off”. LACE will screen all activities under the YOP and whenever sub-projects or activities are expected to lead to the taking of land and involuntary resettlement, will prepare a Resettlement Action Plan, based on the principles included in this RPF, submit it to the World Bank for prior approval, and thereafter implement approved RAPs to ensure that economically or physically displaced people are properly compensated and no worse off than they were before the resettlement.

Valuations, Eligibility and Entitlements

This Resettlement Policy Framework will ensure that where land acquisition is unavoidable, all project affected persons (PAPs) will be compensated for their lost assets at full replacement costs, and in the event of resettlement be provided with supplementary assistance to help them improve, or at least restore, their livelihoods and standards of living to pre-displacement levels.  In all cases after the compensation or resettlement has taken place the PAPs will not be “no worse-off if not better off”.

Based on an understanding of the social structure of the Liberia communities and the nature of the projects, it appears the most likely affected persons will include farmers, fisher folks, squatters and the respective land owners.

The basis of what is to be paid as compensation will be determined by identifying the most appropriate entitlement for each loss based on Bank Policy OP 4.12 and the merit of the option.  An Entitlement Matrix will be establish to set the measure of the payment for all loses or impacts expected from the implementation of the sub-project.

Grievance Redress Mechanisms

In practice, grievances and disputes that arise during the course of implementation of a resettlement and compensation program may be related to the following issues (i) mistakes in inventorying or valuing properties, (ii) disagreement on plot boundaries, either between the affected person and the expropriation agency, (iii) disputed ownership of a given asset (two or more affected people claiming that the affected asset is theirs), (iv) disagreement on plot/asset valuation and  (v) where affected person opt for a resettlement-based option, disagreement on the resettlement package (the location of the resettlement site does not suit them and/ or proposed housing or resettlement plot characteristics are not favourable to them).

Proposed Grievance Redress Mechanism

Grievance redress mechanism for affected people is established under the local government structure.

LACE will establish a register of resettlement/ compensation related grievances and disputes at all levels.  The receipt of complaints will include its logging and registration as this will help with monitoring the status of the grievances and ease reporting on them.  The existence and conditions of access to this register (where, when, how) will be widely disseminated within the project areas as part of the consultation undertaken for the project in general.  The Projects will determine the redress action in consultation with the complainant if necessary and with the representative of the PAPs.

LACE will encourage the grievance redress setups in the local Government (chiefdom and clan levels) to determine the redress action in consultation with the complainant if necessary.  The LACE Grievance Redress Committee will visit the affected property site or get in touch with the complainant to confirm that the redress action is carried out.

Budget and Funding Arrangements

The three components of budgeting are the implementation of the RPF, preparation of RAP and finally the implementation of RAP. The implementation of the RAP will involve addressing all the issues articulated in the RAP and will be borne by the Government of Liberia.

Consultation and Participation

The project affected persons (PAPs) will be consulted and involved in all resettlement activities: planning, implementation and monitoring. Their involvement provides them with greater understanding of the project, the resettlement issues and gives them opportunities to voice out their concerns about the project, and they may offer alternatives and compromises that tend to promote implementation.

Monitoring and Evaluation

Monitoring and evaluation will be a continuous process and will include internal and external monitoring. Internal monitoring of the resettlement/rehabilitation operations will be undertaken by LACE and County Administrators. External monitoring will be done by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and relevant NGOs, will be considered in the external monitoring.

Disclosure of Social Safeguards Instruments

LACE will disclose this Resettlement Policy Framework and subsequent RAPs by making copies available at its head office and the County Administrative offices in which the sub-projects are being undertaking. The Government of Liberia will also agree with the World Bank to disclose this RPF electronically through its InfoShop.

TRODUCTION

This Resettlement Policy Framework (RPF) has been updated in compliance with the World Bank (WB) requirements as inscribed in its policy on Involuntary Resettlement (OP4.12).  The RPF is primarily intended to meet the legal requirements of said policy and the Government of Liberia and the Liberia Agency for Community Empowerment (LACE) in addressing the concerns of people affected by the activities under sub-components 1B (Household Enterprises) and 2A (Productive Public works and Life Skills Support) of the Youth Opportunities Project (YOP).

1.1    Background

LACE was established by an Act of the Liberian National Legislature to implement community driven development projects. The objective of LACE is to improve the welfare of poor communities, most of which have been devastated by the long period of civil unrest. LACE was selected by the Government of Liberia and the World Bank as the implementing partner for subcomponents 1B and 2A of the YOP Project.

1.2    Description of YOP Project’s components.

1.2.1     Component 1: Pre-Employment Social Support and Household Enterprises for Urban Youth

This component will contribute to addressing youth labor market participation and behavioral constraints through the following three sub-components;

Sub-Component 1A: Pre-Employment Social Support

The objective of this sub-component is to increase the employment readiness of youth by supporting the development of non-cognitive skills, and positive attitudes towards work. This sub-component will offer intensive pre-employment and psychosocial support to improve productivity. The sub-component will also include psychosocial support to EVD affected youth and survivors. The interventions will consist of evidence-based stabilization and skills-focused group interventions, which integrate elements from cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and group interpersonal therapy in a series of workshops. Such interventions have been demonstrated to increase readiness in other contexts, including post-conflict situations, when combined with educational and economic interventions.  This support will include core sessions to build skills in emotional regulation (including self-esteem and impulsivity), concentration, and problem-solving, which are critical to success in education and in the labor market. Knowledge and skills on Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) will form a core element of the required pre-employment support offered under this sub-component, in order to influence behavior and competency in making the right decisions to succeed in employment and effectively manage their enterprises.

This sub-component will target both out-of-school[1] and in-school cohorts of youth aged 15 – 17 as they prepare for employment and potential inclusion into sub-component 1B. This intervention will support up to 2,000 youth in Montserrado County. Batches of youth in this sub-component will be engaged for 3 – 12 months of training over the five-year period.[2]   The project will use several approaches to reach beneficiaries, including; (i) an on-demand approach through targeting centers; and (ii) a recruitment team that will seek out vulnerable youth in designated districts and clans of the county. These approaches will be complemented by a public information communications (PIC) campaign to disseminate the program’s objectives, design, and general eligibility. The PIC will also use various community structures and youth groups to disseminate information and connect with potential applicants. Subsequently, a simple poverty targeting tool to verify common features of poverty and vulnerability (analogous to a Proxy Means Test) will be used to generate the final list of beneficiaries from the pool of applicants.

Due to the specialized nature of the interventions in this sub-project, an experienced service provider will be recruited to undertake training and counseling activities. An impact evaluation of this sub-component will be undertaken as will be described in the Project Operational Manual (POM).

Sub-Component 1B: Household Enterprises

Youth operating in household enterprises are constrained by lack of capital, inadequate skills, congesting and lack of physical space to work in urban settings. In response to these constraints, this sub-component aims to; (i) increase labor productivity of youth working in household enterprises, and (ii) facilitate the entry of youth into household enterprises. This intervention will support about 3,300 vulnerable youth in groups of 8 with on-the-job apprenticeships, formal vocational training, tools/equipment, basic business management training and start-up grants. This sub-component will be implemented in Montserrado County. The justification for the selection of this county include: (i) the county has the highest concentration of youth in Liberia; (ii) the county has been significantly affected by EVD; and (iii) the high population density of vulnerable households in Montserrado County makes it urgent to support the improvement and welfare of these youth.

Two cohorts of beneficiaries will be considered: (i) youth who are new entrants into household enterprises, who are underemployed and not in school; and (ii) youth involved in existing household enterprises and who can demonstrate management of an active household enterprise over the last 2 years. New entrants will be supported with on-the-job apprenticeships or vocational training (offered through existing formal vocational training institutes) to improve their skills and start new businesses. Government’s medium term focus is to rebuild infrastructure and the energy sectors of the economy. Accordingly, job opportunities are expected in these sectors (e.g. carpentry, metal fabrication, block making, and electrical technicians), as well as related services. Even for youth who are operating in these sectors, business growth of these household enterprises is hindered by poor quality of outputs and services. This sub-component will initially focus on the construction and related service sectors, and support these household enterprises with apprenticeships, vocational training, tools/equipment, and cash grants to improve quality.

For new entrants, the project will set up targeting centers and use an on-demand approach to generate lists of potential beneficiaries, as well as using the list of beneficiaries who complete pre-employment support offered under sub-component 1A. Youth who complete the pre-employment support will be considered automatically eligible. The on-demand process will consist of three key activities; (i) formation of  registration teams; (ii) a public information communications campaign to disseminate the program’s objectives, design, general eligibility and to solicit applications from applicants; and (iii) receipt of applications from potential beneficiaries. The communications campaign will also utilize various community structures and youth groups to disseminate information on the YOP. Subsequently, a poverty targeting validation tool to verify common features of poverty and vulnerability (analogous to a Proxy Means Test) will be used to generate a list of potential beneficiaries from the pool of applicants. A community validation process will then be undertaken to ensure that only applicants with positive peer and community endorsements progress are included. As part of this process, a community validation exercise will be undertaken to ensure that potential beneficiary youth have positive community and peer endorsements, and are not involved in drug abuse. The final list of youth selected as beneficiaries will then be made available at the community level for a period of not less than one week to allow the community members to provide feedback. Any discrepancies will be corrected before confirming the list of Project beneficiaries.

After the targeting process, a Service Provider will facilitate the organization of youth into groups based on their self-defined interests. The number of youth in each group under this sub-component will be a maximum of 8 individuals; one individual from each household. Experience shows that the complexities of coordination, trust and group dynamics issues are more manageable in such small groups. 50 percent of the group membership will be females. The groups will be facilitated to prepare sub-project proposals, which will be evaluated and approved (further details will be provided in the POM). As part of this preparation, the Service Provider will also coach beneficiaries on basic business and money management practices.

Each youth group will be able to access a grant of US$2,400 per approved sub-project (equivalent to US$300 per individual), which will be released in tranches after the achievement of each milestone. The grants will be used to purchase tools, materials, and equipment for use on an approved sub-project over a period of 1 year. The group will also use the grant to access formal vocational training. The size of the grant has been determined based on the existing lessons on the minimum amount capital required to receive on the job training and start a household enterprise. The youth groups will procure the requisite supplies through a community procurement process, facilitated by the Service Provider. The service provider will coordinate with city officials and the county YOP committee to provide appropriate locations to facilitate the development of their enterprises. The service provider will continue to provide support to the youth groups for up to 6 months after the end of the sub-project. This includes supporting the youth groups to; (i) federate and formalize their household enterprises to form a sustainable community institution, (ii) establish modalities for the distribution of sub-project dividends and (iii) link the youth with to existing institutions, such as village savings groups.

This component requires master trainers who have the requisite business skills in the various trades to provide on-the-job coaching to beneficiaries. There are several sources of such master trainers. There are some medium-sized enterprises that produce relatively higher quality outputs, however, need to be better equipped in order to provide apprenticeships to youth under this project. This sub-component will therefore support such medium-scale enterprises with tools/equipment, in order for them to train both new entrants and existing youth household enterprises. To qualify for this support, however, these medium scale enterprises must be functional, registered with the Ministry of Commerce and have a minimum operating capital of US$8,000. A second source of master trainers are skilled retired technicians, who will also be mobilized to provide technical support and training. Thirdly, in circumstances where the requisite skills are not in country, distance-learning arrangements via video conferencing will be organized to train the youth. A call for proposal approach will be used for medium scale enterprises and master trainers who would like to participate in this sub-project.

 

Sub-component 1C: Capacity and Systems Building

 

The objective of this sub-component is to support capacity and systems building to key stakeholders at both central and local levels involved in the implementation of the YOP. Given that there many players in the Youth Sector in Liberia, YOP will provide Technical Assistance to the Ministry of Youth and Sports to coordinate the activities of actors in the sector. In addition, the sub-component will finance: (i) preparation of project operational procedures and guidelines; (ii) knowledge exchange events, (iii) labor market intervention training (with an emphasis on soft skills in managing youth groups) for project staff, implementing agencies and service providers; (iv) provision of tools/equipment for implementing agencies; and (v) studies that will enhance youth employment dialogue in Liberia.

MYS will also be supported with several distinct sets of system building activities, specifically; (i) capacity building for the introduction of ICT-based operational enhancements (including targeting and electronic registration), (ii) building of a Monitoring and Evaluation system to monitor project results (which would in turn support the systematic tracking of results for the youth sector in general), (iii) development and implementation of social accountability and a grievance redress mechanism for Components 1 and 2 of the project, (iv) at least 3 evaluation surveys. An Impact Evaluation of the Pre-Employment Social Support and Household Enterprises Component and Productive Public Works Component and Life Skills will be undertaken to measure the project’s impact on income generation opportunities of beneficiary youth.

1.2.2     Component 2.  Productive Public Works and Life Skills Support for Rural Youth.

This Component will consist of two sub-components: (i) Sub-component 2A: Life Skills Support and Productive Public Works; and (ii) Sub-component 2B: Capacity and Systems Building.

Sub-Component 2A: Productive Public Works and Life Skills Support for Rural Youth

The objective of this component is to provide vulnerable youth in rural areas with immediate consumption smoothing support through productive public works and life skills training. The sub-component will adopt a community-driven development approach to engage youth in productive public works activities with an emphasis on community-level farm production. The component would support the preparation of new land for cultivation, and providing resources to youth groups to purchase agricultural inputs and agro processing.

Life skills support will aim at the following: conflict resolution, peer community awareness on sanitation, hygiene and health promotion to enhance the long-term benefits to rural youth participating in the productive public works program. This component would also focus on behavior modification around self-esteem, Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH), communication strategies, work readiness, teamwork, community relations as well as basic business and money management practices.

This component will be targeted towards vulnerable youth (aged 18 – 35 years) in rural areas in all counties across Liberia. 10,000 beneficiary youth will be supported in groups of 28. Each youth will be required to cultivate 0.5 hectares of land for community agricultural projects.  A community-based selection approach will be utilized to select beneficiaries. The selection criteria will also include youth who are residents of the community and underemployed. Emphasis will be placed on non-traditional crops in Liberia (such as pineapples) that have a ready market. The component will also facilitate linkages between production, processing and marketing. Facilitation of the flow of information (using innovative ICT solutions) on markets and prices will be supported.

Planning for each sub-project will follow the agricultural seasonal cycle. The sub-project cycle will be based on the main planting season, which occurs from March to May each calendar year. Each member will be guaranteed a total of 100 days per year: 60 days of work on sub-project agricultural activities, 20 days of business training and 20 days of life skills training. The full sub-project cycle will be detailed in the POM.

Beneficiaries will be incentivized at a daily rate of US$3.00 per day (and up to $300 per season) in the initial phase of the program (this rate may be revised over the course of implementation to take into account increases in prices of the food basket and basic needs). The rate is currently appropriate for self-targeting because it is below official daily minimum wage of $4, lower than the average market rate for unskilled labor, and consistent with rates currently being offered by other public works programs. It is expected that only vulnerable youth with no other, more attractive, livelihood alternatives or employment opportunities will be willing to participate in this program. Although cash incentives are computed on a daily basis, each youth group will receive payments on a piece rate basis, based on the completion of specific sub-project milestones (e.g. clearing, sowing, crop maintenance, harvesting). This will require that youth groups develop a milestone list (including completion of specific life and business skills modules) that will be posted and the money will be disbursed once the Community Oversight Committees and the implementing partner(s) verify the achievements. Benchmarks and standards will be set for each activity with technical support of community facilitators to ensure quality in the delivery of each milestone. Beneficiary groups can also expect to receive agricultural inputs worth up to $100 to support their sub-projects.

The project will also facilitate the signing of Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) between local chiefs/community leaders and youth groups to grant access to identified community land.  To ensure stability and create incentives for youth to invest in livelihood activities, these MOUs would include provisions for access to the community land for agricultural purposes by the youth groups for up to 3 years.

 

Sub-Component 2B: Capacity and Systems Building

The objective of this sub-component is to finance capacity and systems building for the Liberian Agency for Community Empowerment (LACE) for the implementation of Life Skills Support and Productive Public Works. In particular, capacity building will support; (i) technical assistance to support sub-project implementation, with particular attention to training Farm Management Committees in community organization, project identification, beneficiary selection, community financial management and procurement processes, as well as monitoring and evaluation; (ii) technical assistance and monitoring by Community Agriculture Technicians, (iii) preparation of project operational procedures and guidelines, and (iv) knowledge exchange events, including seminars at the county, district and central government levels and local and international study tours, (iii) labor market intervention training  (with an emphasis on soft skills in managing youth groups) for project staff, implementing agencies and service providers;. Several distinct sets of system building activities will also be supported, including capacity building for the introduction of ICT-based operational enhancements (e.g., electronic registration and payment systems), Monitoring and Evaluation systems and Development Communication activities.

1.2.3     Component 3: Capacity and Systems Building for Cash Transfers

 

With the Ebola outbreak, a number of Development Partners are financing cash transfer programs in Liberia.  This component aims to improve efficiency in the delivery of cash transfers to targeted households in Liberia.  In particular, this component will support the building of blocks for a basic safety nets system including: (i) improving the process of targeting extremely poor households through the introduction of a Proxy Means Test (PMT); (ii) improving operational efficiency by strengthening ICT systems, particularly Management Information and electronic payments systems; (iii) ensuring the design and implementation of a functional M&E system; and (iv) strengthening of social accountability and grievance redress systems.  It will complement and improve the delivery efficiency of the existing cash transfer programs in Liberia including the Bank financed USD 5 million cash transfer program (financed under the Ebola Emergency Response Project – P152359) which aims to provide consumption smoothening to up to 10,000 households who are extremely poor, labor constrained, and affected by EVD. This program is building on the lessons of an EU and UNICEF-supported Social Cash Transfer program to extreme poor and labor constrained households in Bomi and Maryland counties, implemented through the MGCSP.

This component will specifically support capacity building within the MGCSP to; (i) set minimum standards of operations in the modalities of targeting, identifying and delivering cash transfers, (ii) prepare project operational procedures and guidelines, (iii) develop coordination mechanisms and ensure synergies in the implementation of this sub-component, and (v) provide knowledge exchange events, including seminars at the county, district and central government levels and local and international study tours.

For sustainability and continuity, the government has expressed interest in consolidating the implementation of safety net systems by scaling up cash transfer investments to more extremely poor households for a longer time in line with its Social Protection policy. This approach will set the foundation for support to a systems approach to Social Protection in Liberia. This will better position the government to respond to systematic shocks such as widespread health outbreaks, unexpected weather events or deteriorations in global food prices that negatively impact vulnerable populations within the country. Government envisages long term support for cash transfer systems building and implementation.

1.2.4     Component 4 Project Implementation and Coordination

The MYS will bear the overall responsibility of ensuring the effective implementation of this project. There will be three implementing partners, each of whom will be responsible for implementing specific sub-components. Specifically, (i) the Ministry of Youth and Sports (MYS) will be responsible for implementing Pre-employment Social Support as well as Capacity and Systems Building; (ii) the Liberia Agency for Community Empowerment (LACE) will be responsible for the implementation of Household Enterprises, Life Skills Support and Productive Public Works, as well as Capacity and Systems Building; and (iii) the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection (MGCSP) will be responsible for implementing Cash Transfers and Capacity and Systems Building. Each agency will also be provided with Project Management and Coordination. The table below summarizes these arrangements.

Table 3: Youth Opportunities Project Implementing Agencies and sub-component

Implementing Agency
Sub-Components
MYS
1A: Pre-employment Social Support 

1C: Capacity and Systems Building 

4A: Project Management and Coordination
LACE
1B: Household Enterprises

2A: Productive Public Works and Life Skills Support 

2B: Capacity and Systems Building

4B: Project Management and Coordination
MGCSP
3: Capacity and Systems Building for Cash Transfers

4C: Project Management and Coordination
This distribution is based on the strategic position of the MYS to coordinate the youth sector, the recent experience of LACE in the implementation of a number of productive public works, enterprise support and skills training programs, and the mandate of the MGCSP to implement Cash Transfer program. Existing county structures, in particular the County Steering Committee, chaired by the County Superintendent, will support implementation at their level.




This component will consist of three sub-components:

 

Sub-component 4A: Project Management and Coordination for the Ministry of Youth and Sports

The objective of this sub-component is to support activities related to project management and coordination. This includes equipment, vehicles, fuel, office space, and communications costs, and incremental project-related operating costs under the MYS. This support will include support for the procurement of a service provider to implement Pre-employment Social Support, implementation of the MYS’ Capacity and Systems building activities, , and facilitation of county steering committees and community oversight committees in the implementation of sub-component activities. This sub-component will also support coordination and consolidation of annual and quarterly reports for the entire project. The Ministry will ensure collaboration across sectors and counties, and as well as linkages with other policy makers in the overall implementation of the YOP project. 

Sub-component 4B: Project Management and Coordination for the Liberian Agency for Community Empowerment

The objective of this sub-component is to support activities related to project management and coordination. This includes equipment, vehicles, fuel, office space, and communications costs, and incremental project-related operating costs under LACE for the implementation of Household Enterprises, Life Skills Training, Productive Public Works, and Capacity and Systems Building sub-components of the project. This support will include procurement of a service provider to implement Life Skills training, facilitation of county steering committees and community oversight committees in the implementation of sub-component activities.

 

Sub-component 4C: Project Management and Coordination for the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection 

The objective of this sub-component is to support activities related to project management and coordination. This includes equipment, vehicles, fuel, office space, and communications costs, and incremental project-related operating costs under the MGCSP for the implementation of Capacity and Systems Building for Cash Transfers component of the project.  This support will include the procurement of service providers to implement operational aspects of the Cash Transfers, including data collection, electronic registration and payments mechanisms.



2      PRINCIPLES, RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES OF THE RPF

The Public Productivity works and Household Enterprises Sub-projects activities to be undertaken  under  YOP Project may  involve  land use implications and trigger  the  World  Bank  Safeguards  Policy  on Involuntary Resettlement (OP/ BP 4.12).   This RPF has been prepared to apply to any Sub-project which may have implications of loss of assets or access to assets important to production, the loss of income sources or means of livelihood.

2.1    Rationale for Preparing RPF


The RPF will provide project stakeholders with procedures to address compensation issues as related to affected properties/ livelihoods including land and income generated activities during project implementation. In general, involuntary resettlement and land acquisition should be avoided where feasible, or minimized, exploring all viable alternatives.

The main purpose of the RPF is to clarify resettlement principles, organizational arrangements, and design criteria to be applied to sub-projects to be prepared during project implementation. The framework will describe eligibility criteria for resettlement of affected households or businesses in the project zones; categories of project affected persons (PAPs) and measures for restoring livelihoods. The framework will provide compensation payments procedures and describe dispute resolution mechanisms. PAPs should be meaningfully consulted and should have opportunities to participate in planning and implementing resettlement programs. The RPF will be used in the eventual preparation of Resettlement Action Plans (RAPs) when subprojects are expected to lead to involuntary resettlement.

LACE will be responsible for facilitating the implementation, monitoring and follow-up on the activities that may be required as a result of an implementation of Sub-projects.

2.2    Objectives of the RPF

The overall objectives of this RPF are:
  •  Develop a resettlement policy for the Additional ACGF Funding for the YOP Project Component 1: Community Livelihoods;
  •  Describe the principles underlying the loss of income or livelihood;
  •  Describe institutional arrangements for resolving potential conflicts involving displaced persons; and
  •  Describe the arrangements for implementing and monitoring the resettlement process.
2.3    Resettlement Policy Framework Principles




The World Bank Group’s OP 4.12 on Involuntary Resettlement provides that land-for- land resettlement is generally the preferred option. However, the resettlement plan must take into account legal and customary land rights in the country. 




World Bank Operational Policy (OP) 4.12 will apply for the involuntary resettlement of owners and users of project lands. OP 4.12 requires that planning for resettlement be an integral part of the project design, and should be initiated as early in the project as possible. The policy sets out the following policy statements for consideration during resettlement planning:




(a) Involuntary resettlement should be avoided or minimized where feasible, exploring all viable alternative project designs.

 (b) Where displacement is unavoidable, resettlement plans should be developed. All involuntary resettlement should be conceived and executed as development progresses with re-settlers receiving sufficient investment resources and opportunities to share in project benefits. Displaced persons should be (i) compensated for their losses at full replacement cost prior to the actual move; (ii) assisted with the move and supported during the transition period in the resettlement site; and (iii) assisted in their efforts to improve their former living standards, income earning capacity, and production levels, or at least to restore them. Particular attention should be paid to the needs of the poorest groups to be resettled.

(c) Community participation in planning and implementing resettlement should be encouraged.  Appropriate patterns of social organization should be established, and existing social and cultural institutions of re-settlers and their hosts should be supported and used to the greatest extent possible.

(d) Re-settlers should be integrated socially and economically into host communities so that adverse impacts on host communities are minimized. The best way of achieving this integration is for resettlement to be planned in areas benefiting from the project and through consultation with future hosts.

(e) Lands, housing infrastructure, and other compensation should be provided to the adversely affected population, indigenous groups, ethnic minorities, and pastoralists who may have usufruct or customary rights to the land or other resources taken for the project. The absence or legal title to land by such groups should not be a bar to compensation.

3      Legal Framework

The Government of Liberia (GoL) has set up the Government Reform Commission (GRC) to address the challenges emanating from land tenure and legal system amongst other issues.

3.1    Policy Framework


3.1.1     World Bank OP 4.12- Involuntary Resettlement

The World Bank’s safeguards policies operate to prevent and mitigate potential adverse impacts associated with the Bank’s lending operation to people and their environment.  The YOP may trigger the World Bank’s safeguard policy on OP 4.12 – Involuntary Resettlement. 

This policy covers direct economic and social impacts that result from Bank-assisted investment projects, and are caused by (a) the involuntary taking of assets resulting in: relocation or loss of shelter; loss of assets or access to assets; or loss of income sources or means of livelihood, whether or not the affected persons must move to another location, (b) the involuntary restriction of access to legally designated parks and protected areas resulting in adverse impacts on the livelihoods of the affected persons.

3.2    Regulatory Framework

The Constitution and other Liberian Laws provide basis for resettlement and compensation. This section presents a detailed description of the legal framework for the implementation of involuntary resettlement projects in Liberia. The following Liberian laws and policy comprise the legal framework.

3.2.1     Draft Land Rights Policy, May 2013

The draft Land Rights Policy defines Public Land, Government Land, Customary Land and Private Land as well as Protected Areas that will be conserved for the benefits of all Liberians.

The formulation of the Policy was guided by the following principles: secure land rights, economic growth, equitable benefits, equal access, equal protection, environmental protection, clarity, participation and evidence based.  Most significantly, the policy aims to address historic inequalities by recommending that customary lands are given protection equal to that of private lands.

3.2.2     3.2.2 Land Rights Act 2018

Following the validation of the Land Rights Policy in 2013, the Land Commission drafted a Land Rights Bill designed to provide a legal framework to implement the Land Rights Policy. The Bill was subsequently passed into law in September 2018, i.e. The Land Rights Act, 2018. The  Act is a major step in reforming the land laws of Liberia with emphasis on safeguarding the rights of rural communities to own land. 

The Act, among other things, defines the categories of land, eligibility to own land or rights in land, the nature of land ownership, and the different types of customary lands in Liberia. The Act provides for four categories of land ownership in Liberia including Public Land, Government Land, Customary and Private Land. Whilst the AF will not finance acquisition or expansion of existing lands used by various youth groups and beneficiaries under the project, this Act provides the new framework for addressing land rights issues if they arise.  

3.2.3     Liberian Constitution 1986

Article 22 (a) and (b) of the Constitution vests in all individuals the right to own property either on individual basis or in conjunction with other individuals, as long as they are Liberian citizens. This right however does not extend to mineral resources on, or beneath the land.

3.2.4     Land Act 1856

Prior to independence, land acquisition and distribution was done on the basis of relationship and class system. Opposition to this system of land tenure led to the establishment of a set of rules known as the ‘digest of law to govern the affairs of the settlers in terms of land distribution’. This later culminated into the Land Distribution Act of 1856 which removed the restriction to land distribution based on citizenship. This Act was repealed by the 1950 Land Act which restricted land ownership to citizens and naturalized citizens especially those of Negro descents.

3.2.5     County Act 1969

This Act officially distributed and demarcated land boundaries in Liberia. Prior to the Act, counties were created through political means. For instance the three older counties in Liberia- Montserrado, Sinoe, and Maryland were all products of political events.

3.2.6     Land Acquisition Act 1929

The Act lays down the procedure for obtaining rights to any piece of land in Liberia through purchase. The Act distinguishes land in Liberia into two categories viz: the Hinterland and the County areas.

The procedure for obtaining land located in the Hinterland is as follows:
 Obtaining consent of Tribal Authority to have a parcel of land deeded to the individual by the Government,
  •  Pay a sum of money as a token of his intention to live peacefully with the tribesmen,
  •  Paramount or clan chief signs a certificate, which the purchaser forwards to the office of the District Commissioner (who also acts as the Land Commissioner for the area).
The District Commissioner after satisfying himself that the land is not encumbered in anyway approves that the land be deeded to the applicant and issues a certificate to that effect.

The procedure for obtaining land located in the County Area is as follows:


  •  Apply to the Land Commissioner in the county in which the land is located
  •  The Commissioner shall issue a certificate if he is satisfied that the land is unencumbered.
Upon completion of the above steps, the purchase shall pay the Bureau of Revenues the value of the land valued at a minimum rate of fifty (50) cents per acre (Land article 24 of the 1986 Liberian Constitution). He shall obtain and submit a receipt to the president for an order to have the land surveyed. A deed will then be drawn up by the Land Commissioner, authenticated, and given to the purchaser.

3.3    Institutional Framework for implementing Resettlement Action Plans


As stated earlier, once project activities under YOP trigger World Bank Operational Policy (OP) 4.12, a Resettlement Action Plan will be developed facilitate the resettlement of PAPs. The institutions involved and responsible for the preparation and implementation of the RPF are:


  •  LACE
  •  Environmental Protection Agency (EPA);
  •  Ministry of Youth and Sport;
  •  Ministry of Public Works (MOPW);
  •  Ministry of Agriculture;
  •  Local Government Authorities (LGA); and
  •  Local NGOs
3.3.1     Liberia Agency for Community Empowerment (LACE)

LACE is the implementing partner for sub-components 1B and 2A of the YOP Project and therefore is responsible for the overall management of these activities, including the RFP. LACE will screen all activities under the YOP and whenever sub-projects or activities are expected to lead to the taking of land and involuntary resettlement, will prepare a Resettlement Action Plan based on the principles included in this RPF (including its annexe, submit it to the World Bank for prior approval, and thereafter the Community Facilitators and Community Oversight Committees will implement approved RAPs to ensure that economically or physically displaced people are properly compensated and no worse off than they were before the resettlement. 

3.3.2     Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

The EPA is mandated to set environmental quality standards and ensure compliance with pollution control. It is responsible for the provision of guidelines for the preparation of Environment Assessments and Audits, and the evaluation of environmental permits. These may include certification procedure for landfill and other activities potentially dangerous to the environment. 

The EPA is also established to coordinate, monitor, supervise and consult with relevant stakeholders on all activities in the protection of the environment and sustainable use of natural resources.

3.3.3     Ministry of Youth and Sports (MOYS)

The MOYS is the lead ministry designated by Government to oversee youth-related policy and programming, including the YOP Project.

The Ministry is responsible for the formulation and implementation of policies and programmes aimed at providing employment for youths and helping them to achieve their full potential, spiritually, vocationally and culturally as positively motivated, socially responsible and economically productive citizens through sports oriented activities for recreation, leisure, health and fitness.
3.3.4     Ministry of Public Works (MOPW)

The MOPW is responsible for land-use zoning and will be engaged in site the selection of sub-projects.

The Ministry of Public Works carries out the following broad functions:
  • Provision of advice, technical services, planning, design and construction of works projects for other Government Departments and Agencies.
  • Management of works and maintenance programmes associated with public buildings, roads bridges, airfields, jetties, water supplies, sewerage and rural electricity; and
  • Maintenance and operation of facilities owned by the Government.
3.3.5     Ministry of Agriculture

The Project will coordinate with the Ministry of Agriculture, particularly the County and District Agriculture Extension workers on community sub-projects related to farming. 




The Ministry plays a pivotal role in the Liberia economy, providing critical and reciprocal linkages with all the other sectors of the economy and accounts for 50 per cent of the total formal employment. It is committed to stimulate sectoral growth, guarantee food security and improve the living standard of all people in Liberia.

3.3.6     Local Government Authorities (LGA)

The LGA oversees the operation of the local government system and implements policy in relation to local government structures, functions, human resources and financing.  

The LGAs are responsible for the management of development at the county and district levels.  As such, they are involved in site selection of the sub-projects.  

3.3.7     Local NGOs

The local NGOs (Community Facilitators) are contracted by LACE to facilitate community development of sub-projects and monitor their day-to-day implementation.

3.4    Land Tenure System

3.4.1     Customary Tenure

Customary tenure involves the use of land, which the government has granted to people in the hinterland through customary rights. Such rights begin with the Town Chief, then the Clan or paramount Chief and finally the District Commissioner. The District Commissioner prepares Customary Land Grant Certificates, which are subsequently legalised by the president of Liberia.

3.4.2     Freehold Tenure

It derivesits legality from the constitution and its incidents from the written law. It involves holding land in perpetuity or a term fixed by a condition and enables the holding to exercise, subject to the law, full powers of ownership.

3.4.3     Leasehold Tenure

This is created either by contract or by operation of the law; it is a form under which the landlord or lessor grants the tenant or lessor exclusive right of the land, usually for a specific period in return for a rent, granting the tenant security of tenure and a proprietary interest in the land.

3.4.4     Land Valuation System

Title to all land vests in the state. Thus the GoL is the original grantor of land and the public are all grantees. One who obtains land from the state has a bona fide title and right to full possession and use of the land. However the state has the right to revoke any previously granted title. Before such power can be exercised, the state through its institutions is statutorily obliged to first evaluate the current market value of the property to be acquired with the aim of providing just compensation to the affected owner. Where the land to be revoked is in public use, the state has the burden of replacing it with one of commensurate value.

In the case of public land, section 31 of the 1986 Liberian Code provides the procedure for determining the cost as follows:

One dollar per acre for land on the margin of a river;
  •  Fifty cents per acre for land in the interior; and
  •  Thirty dollars per lot for town lots.
3.5    Compensation

Article 24 of the 1986 Liberia Constitution provides the basis for compensation for acquired land.  It states that, “expropriation may be authorized for national security issues or where the public health and safety are endangered, or for any other public purposes, provided.”




For the expropriation to be successful the following issues need to be addressed:
  •  Prompt payment of just compensation;
  •  That such expropriation or the compensation offered may be challenged freely by the owner of the property in a court of law with no penalty for having brought such action; and
  •  That when property taken for public use ceases to be used for the intended purpose, republic shall accord the former owner, the right of first refusal to reacquire the property.
3.6    World Bank Safeguard Policies on Involuntary Resettlement

The full text of OP 4.12 including its Annex A on Resettlement Instruments is presented in Annex 1.




OP 4.12 on Involuntary Resettlement is to be complied with where impacts on livelihoods, impacts on assets, acquisition of land or restrictions to natural resources may take place as a result of sub-project activities. Where there is a difference between national legislation and World Bank policy, World Bank policy will be applied and followed. It includes requirements that:

Involuntary Resettlement should be avoided or minimised exploring all viable alternatives project designs;
  •  Where it is not feasible to avoid resettlement, resettlement activities should be conceived and executed as sustainable development programs, providing sufficient investment resources to enable persons affected by the project to share in project benefits.
  •  Affected people should be consulted and should have opportunities to participate in planning and implementing resettlement programs;
  •  impacted persons should be assisted in their effort to improve their livelihoods and standards of living or at least to restore them to pre impact levels or to levels prevailing prior to the beginning of project implementation, whichever is higher;
According to OP 4.12, the Resettlement Plans (RAP) ) should include measures to ensure that the affected persons are:


  •  Informed about the options and rights pertaining to impacts caused by project activities;
  •  Consulted on, offered choices among, and provided with technically and economically feasible alternatives; and
  •  Provided prompt and effective compensation at full replacement cost for losses
  •  attributable directly to the project;
If impacts include physical relocation, the RAP (Annex 2 shows template for preparation of RAP) includes measures to ensure that PAPs are:

Provided assistance (such as moving allowance) during relocation; and
  •  Provided with residential housing or housing sites or as required.
3.7    Compensation of National and International Practices

Although Liberia has several laws concerning title to land and property, as compensation for acquisition of property, these regulation are ‘asset-oriented’ in contrast to the World Bank policies which focus on both asset and the restoration of livelihoods.


The asset oriented scheme of the GoL focuses on compensation based on pecuniary estimate of lost assets in exclusion of the socio- economic losses. A summary comparison between Liberian regulations and applicable WB policies is shown in Table 3.1.

The Project’s compensation and resettlement program is designed to meet the Liberian legislation and is also guided by the provisions of the WB policies and therefore, all differences identified for this Project are bridged by the Project’s compensation and resettlement policies. In particular, the Project’s compensation and resettlement policies include provision for compensation at ‘replacement cost’ and also for providing financial and technical assistance to affected people to support economic and livelihood restoration activities will be borne by the Government of Liberia.

The right of an aggrieved to seek redress is statutorily recognised under Liberian laws. Where the grievance is against an agency of GoL, the steps in seeking redress is to lodge a complaint with the GoL ministry or agency which shall conduct a hearing and make a determination on the matter. Such decision is subject to appeal to a regular court.

Jurisdiction of the court is hierarchically structured with decision of lower courts subject and appealable to higher courts. The supreme court of Liberia is the highest court and its decisions are not appealable. The time frame for instituting proceeding depends on the gravity and nature of injury involved.

The table below compares Liberian legislation to OP 4.12. Where there is a difference, OP 4.12 shall apply.

Table 3.1: Comparison between Liberian Regulations and World Bank Policies


Theme
Liberian Legislation
World Bank Policies OP 4.12
Mitigation Measures
Categories of

affected individuals


•      There is no distinction between affected individuals.

•      Land owners, land users, owners of buildings and owners of perennial crops are all lumped together and treated likewise.

•      There are no separate provisions for especially vulnerable classes of people
•      Involuntary Resettlement should be avoided where feasible, or minimized.

•      Particular attention should be given to vulnerable groups

•      Affected persons should be assisted to improve their livelihoods and standards of living or at least to restore them to pre- project levels.


Project should be designed to distinguish between classes of affected individuals and this should be taken into consideration in awarding compensation


Impacts
•   Addresses only direct physical impact of acquiring land.

•   Socio-economic considerations are not given priority.
•      Compensation involves direct economic and social impact cause by acquisition.

•      It is good practice for the borrower to undertake social assessment and implementation measure to minimize adverse impacts, particularly to poor and vulnerable groups.
Design project to take socio-economic issues into consideration in determining compensation
Compensation &

Participation
•      Affected person are to be informed before repossession of land.

•      There is no provision on the notice period, and

•      There is no distinction between farmed land, and developed land.
Affected persons should be:

• Informed in a timely manner on their options and right

pertaining to resettlement

• Offered choices among, and provided with technically and economically feasible resettlement alternatives.

• Provided with timely and relevant information to host communities receiving re-settlers.
Adequate communication between government agencies and affected individuals well ahead of scheduled period of repossession and implementation of project.
Eligibility for

compensation &

benefits
Compensation is restricted to individuals having a legal title to affected land or required.
The absence of legal title to land or other assets is not, in itself, a bar to compensate for lots assets or other resettlement assistance.
Design project to extend compensation(Social and economic) to individuals who do not have legal title to property
Monitoring &

Evaluation
External evaluation is not required
• Internal monitoring and external evaluation are required.
Design project to involve third party input in

assessment of compensation to be paid
4      DESCRIPTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC CONDITIONS




4.1    General




4.1.1     Administrative Structure and Population

Liberia is governed by the 1986 Constitution and administratively divided into 15 counties with a total population of 3,793,400 as estimated in 2008.  Figure 4.1 shows the Map of Liberia.




The social structures of the counties and districts in which these sub-projects are located are administratively similar.  In each county, there are districts, chiefdoms and clans, as well as cities or seats of counties. A county is headed by superintendent while district commissioner, Paramount Chiefs, Clan Chiefs, and city mayors head districts, chiefdoms, clans, and cites respectively. The Town chief is the head of a town/village. These social structures coordinate the chain of authority in the project areas.

4.1.2     Physical Description

The Republic of Liberia is situated on the West Coast of Africa between longitude 7o 18’ –11o 30’ west and latitude 4o 20’-8o 30’ north). It covers an area of 38,000 square miles. Geographically Liberia is bounded on the West by the Republic of Sierra Leone; East by La Cote D’Ivoire (Ivory Coast); North by the Republic of Guinea, and on the South by the Atlantic Ocean.

The relief system of Liberia is sub-divided into 4 relief zones: 1) the coastal Belt extends upland 20 –25 miles (32 to 40 km). It is composed of gently undulating hills or low plains with an altitude not exceeding 50ft (15m), and 3 promontories that appear as landmark from the sea. These are: Cape Mount- which is the highest found in the north-west (close to Sierra Leonean border) and rises steeply to an elevation of over 10,000ft (350m); Cape Mesurado- the second highest in Liberia (in Monrovia) rises to 300ft; Cape Palmas- rises to about 100ft (30m) above sea level (South-East near the mouth of the Cavalla River), and a Belt of Rolling Hills that hardly reached an altitude of 300ft (100m). The coastline or coastal plain of Liberia is estimated at 579km (350 mile) long of almost unbroken sand strip (UNEP, 2004).

The relief zone is characterized by a great number of hills, some discontinuous ranges and occasional escarpments (e.g. Bomi Hills, Goe and Fawtro or Bassa Hills) regarded as the outlier of the disserted tableland that is the larger parts of Liberia’s hinterland. These rolling hills have an elevation of about 90m above sea level and are covered with tropical rainforests.

The disserted plateaus are about 600 to 1000 ft (200-300m) above sea level and are separated from the former belts by steep escarpments that rise to the western and central parts and covering the larger part of the country’s hinterland. These plateaus comprise a series of mountain chains and massifs. The plateau and table lands have an elevation of about 300m while the mountain ranges reach an altitude of 610m.

The northern highlands- are found in the (Wologisi range- South West of Voinjama) along the border with Guinea. Its highest peak- the wuluvi, reaching an altitude of 4450ft (1350m) and the Nimba range form part of the more extensive Nimba complex within the Guinea highlands (with elevations above 6000ft (1800m).

The highest peak on the Liberian side of Nimba range is the guest house hill, initially measured 4,540ft (1385m), but has been gradually leveled by the exploitation of iron ore. 

In reality, the Nimba Mountain (Mount Wuteve with 1,380m at Yekepa) is the highest mountain in Liberia.  The mount is endowed with the highest grade iron deposit in the world. It also contains important minerals. Iron ore mining on Mount Nimba accounted for approximately one per cent of the world production; currently set at around 900 million tons.  The Wologisi Mountain is the second highest peak. The other smaller mountain ranges in Liberia include the Putu Range and Bong Range.

4.1.3     Socio- Economic Profile

Traditionally, Liberia’s agricultural production relies on shifting cultivation of mixed crop system. The principal food crops of Liberia are rice and cassava. Due to insecurity caused by the war, many fields were left unplanted and food production plummeted. The civil war left devastating effect on the country’s economy. The gross domestic product (GDP) decreased by 50%. Research has shown that 76.2% Liberians lives in extreme poverty level. In addition 50% of the population lives on 0.5USD/day. (UNDP, 2003).

The Liberian health care system has suffered with many hospitals and clinics destroyed. Less that 10% of Liberians have access to health care and safe drinking water (World Bank 2000). At the beginning of 2003, the official formal sector unemployment rate in Liberia was 85%. Traditionally, about 75% of the workforce has been involved in agriculture, 15% in government related services and less than 10% in mining and manufacturing.

The years of civil war have left devastating effect on the educational system of Liberia, with 75% of the educational infrastructure damaged or destroyed leading to virtual collapse of educational services. Illiteracy rate is high estimated nationwide at 63%. Of this, rural female illiteracy is reported to be 87.5%. In early 2003, enrollment at primary school level was at 50% for boys, and 24% for girls and only 35% of boys and 27% of girls reach 5th grade level. (MOE, 2004 Annual Report)

4.1.4     Land Use

Liberia has a total land area of 111,370 square kilometers, including 96,320 square kilometers of land (9.63 million hectares) and 15,050 square kilometers of water. About 3.43% of the land is arable, and 1.98% is in permanent crops (2005). About 30 square kilometers are irrigated (2003). Liberia‘s terrain comprises mangrove swamps and beaches along the coast, wooded hills and semi-deciduous shrublands along the immediate interior, and dense tropical forests and plateaus in the interior. The inland grassy plateau and swamplands support agriculture. Forests cover about 45% of the total land area (CIA 2009; USDOS 2009; GOL 2006).

 Figure 1 shows the Map of Liberia


5      VALUATIONS, ELIGIBILITY AND ENTITLEMENTS

5.1    Principles and Objectives

The objective of this Resettlement Policy Framework is to ensure that where land acquisition is unavoidable, all project affected persons (PAPs) will be compensated for their lost assets at full replacement costs, and in the event of resettlement be provided with supplementary assistance to help them improve, or at least restore, their livelihoods and standards of living to pre-displacement levels.  To support this objective, the following principles in pursuit of the principles of intergenerational equity and sustainability will apply:

Consideration of technical options shall involve a concurrent assessment of potential associated land acquisition impacts, so that, where feasible, design alternatives to minimize such impacts can be identified as early as possible. Thus involuntary resettlement will be avoided or minimized by identifying possible alternative project designs and appropriate social, economic, operational and engineering solutions that have the least impact on the population in the Project area;
  •  Project proposals involving involuntary land acquisition or resettlement shall include the costs of compensation/rehabilitation;
  •  Consultation arrangements during the projects preparation processes shall be transparent and inclusive to ensure that all persons affected by involuntary land acquisition or resettlement agree on the mitigation measures;
  •  Replacement of landed properties or agricultural land will be located as near as possible to the
  •  land lost, and at an available site which is acceptable to the PAP;
  •  Lack of formal title to assets lost be it land, house or business premise will not bar a PAP from being entitled to receive assistance to achieve the objective of this RPF once it can be demonstrated beyond all reasonable doubt g., authentication by traditional authority that he/ she has rightful title to the land, house or business;
  •  The cut-off date for eligibility for compensation for physical assets affected by Project activities will be set at the beginning of the census;
  •  After the detailed design has been completed for each component, a census and socioeconomic survey will  be  conducted  as  the  basis  for  resettlement  planning  and  resettlement  plan preparation.    After the detailed design has been completed for each component, a detailed census will be carried out as a basis for compensation;
  •  Land and other assets will only be taken into possession after compensation has been paid to the affected person, and relocation assistance shall likewise be provided before people are displaced;
  •  In the event of any population relocation, efforts will be made for existing social and cultural institutions of  the  people  who  are  being  resettled  to  be  maintained  to  the  greatest  extent possible;
  •  Consideration must be given and assistance provided, where necessary, to those most vulnerable to the adverse impacts of resettlement (including the poorest, female headed households, the disabled and elderly with no means of support, and those from minority groups) to mitigate their hardships and to assist them in improving their livelihood Their needs will be considered in the formulation of the RAP and in the options and mitigation measures;
  •  Distinction should be drawn from PAPs relating to hired business premises and property owners- both should have resettlement benefits;
  •  Preparation of RAPs, as part of sub-project preparation and implementation, is to be carried with the full participation of both affected people, as well as representatives of the local governments of the Project affected areas, community leaders, civil society and social organizations such as the Women’s groups, Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) and N  Comments, concerns and suggestions of those consulted will be duly taken into consideration during the design and implementation phase of the resettlement plans;
  •  Adequate budgetary support will be fully committed and be made available to cover the costs of land acquisition and resettlement and rehabilitation within the agreed implementation period; and
  •  Appropriate reporting, monitoring and evaluation mechanisms will be identified and set in place as part of the resettlement management system.  Monitoring and evaluation of the land acquisition process and the final outcome will be conducted independently of the executing agency.
5.1.1     Minimization of Displacement

In line with the World Bank safeguard policy OP 4.12, the LACE projects will minimize displacement through the following design procedures:
  •  Wherever inhabited dwellings may potentially be affected by a component of a project/ sub-project, the sub-project shall be redesigned (facility relocation, rerouting) to avoid any impact on such dwellings and to avoid displacement/relocation accordingly;
  •  Wherever the impact on the land holding of one particular household is such that this households may not be sustainable in the long term, even if there is no need to physically displace this household, the sub-project shall be redesigned (facility relocation, rerouting) to avoid any such impact;
  •  Costs associated with displacement and resettlement will be internalized into project/ sub-project costs to allow for fair comparison of processes and sites; and
  •  To the extent possible, Project facilities will be located on public spaces.
These principles are intended to minimize negative impacts.  However, it will not be always feasible to avoid displacement or land acquisition.   In addition to impact minimization measures, mitigation measures are therefore needed, hence this RPF.







5.1.2     Fair and Adequate Compensation

One paramount principle of World Bank safeguards is that where people are affected by an undertaking, the aim of compensation or resettlement must be that they should be “no worse-off if not better off” after the compensation or resettlement has taken place.  The compensation package will include loss of income or livelihood restoration assistance or relocation assistance as appropriate plus a disturbance allowance.

5.1.3     Compensation Payment

Compensation principles will be as follows:
  •  Compensation shall be paid prior to displacement / land entry;
  •  Compensation will be at full replacement value.
By contrast with the depreciated or net value of a structure, the “replacement value” includes the full cost of materials and labour required to reconstruct a building of similar surface and standing.  In other words, the affected person must be able to have their structure rebuilt in a different location using the compensation paid for the old building.

5.1.4     Vulnerable Groups

Vulnerable groups are  those at   risk of   becoming   more   vulnerable   due to   the   displacement, compensation, and resettlement process.  Vulnerable people include, but not limited to:
  •  disabled persons, whether mentally or physically;
  •  the elderly, usually above 60 years;
  •  widows;
  •  children;
  •  orphans;
  •  female heads of household
5.1.5     Assistance to Vulnerable Persons

Assistance to vulnerable persons may include the following:
  •  Identification of vulnerable people and identification of the cause and impacts of their vulnerability, either through direct interviews by the Project Staff or through the community; this step is critical because often vulnerable people do not participate in community meetings, and their disability/vulnerability may remain unknown;
  •  Identification of  required  assistance  at  the  various  stages  of  the  process:  negotiation  and
  •  compensation payment as well as moving from the project impacted area;
  •  Implementation of the measures necessary to assist the vulnerable person; and
  •  Monitoring and continuation of assistance after resettlement and/or compensation, if required.
Assistance may take the following forms, depending upon vulnerable persons’ requests and needs:
  •  Assistance in the compensation payment procedure (g., going to the bank with the person to cash the compensation cheque);
  •  Assistance in the post payment period to secure the compensation money and reduce risks of misuse/robbery;
  •  Assistance in  moving  from  project  impacted  area  in  the  form  of  providing  vehicle,  driver  and assistance at the moving stage;
  •  Assistance in building new structures by providing materials, workforce, or building new houses entirely; and
  •  Health care if required at critical periods during the transition period and the stage of moving from the project impacted ar
5.2    Valuation of Assets




Table 5.1 provides the general guideline and method for the preparation of the costs.

Table 5.1    General guidelines and methods for costs preparation
Item
Types
Method
Land
Stool, private lands
Market value as at the time of replacement
Farm crops
Crops and fruit trees

(cassava, oil palm tree, etc)
Market value as at the time of replacement
Standing trees
Ornamental trees, Coconut trees, etc.
Follow EPA requirement. Pay cash for every tree felled and in addition plant two more at location similar to where the other

was felled.
Forests
Dedicated community forest areas, sacred groves,

cemeteries, shrines
Replacement cost method would be used and should be done in consultation with and acceptable to the traditional authorities or

community leaders.
Losses of income and livelihood
Farming, Fishing, etc.
Estimation of net monthly profit for business based on records;

application of net monthly profit to the period when business is not operating.
Redundancy
Formal employment
Redundancy Pay to be dispensed according to the prescription of

the Labour
Disturbance

allowance
-
10% of total compensation
5.3    Eligibility Criteria

Project affected persons are described as persons affected by land acquisition, relocation, or loss of incomes associated with the acquisition of land and/ or other assets, and restriction of access to legally designated sites.

Based on an understanding of the social structure of the Liberia communities and the nature of the projects, it appears the most likely affected persons will include farmers, fisher folks, squatters and the respective land owners and their eligibility for compensation payment is shown in Table 5.2.

Table 5.2        Eligibility Criteria
Category of affected persons
Assets
Type of compensation
Persons with formal legal rights to

land.
Physical and non- physical assets such as residential structures, productive lands, farm lands, cultural sites commercial/ business properties, tenancy, income earning opportunities, and social and cultural networks and activities
To be provided compensation for land lost

and other assistance
Persons without formal legal rights to land at time of notification but have claims to property recognized

by community leaders
To be provided compensation for land lost and other assistance
Persons with no recognizable legal right  or  claim  to  land  they  are

occupying, e.g. squatters
To be  provided  resettlement assistance  in lieu of compensation for land occupied.
Persons encroaching on land after the notification
Not eligible for compensation or any form of resettlement assistance
Redundancy
Loss of Livelihood
Redundancy  pay  in  accordance  with  the

Labour law
 

5.4    Method to Determine the Cut – Off Dates

It will be important to set a cut-off date at an early stage of the preparation process in order to avoid speculation and illegitimate claims at a later stage.




An appropriate cut-off date will be the time when the assessment of persons and their property in the sub-project area is carried out, i.e. the time when the sub-project area has been identified and when the baseline survey, census and preliminary asset inventory is undertaken.

Thereafter, no new cases of PAPs will be considered. Unfinished structures would be identified and secured, and unused materials will be piled at the site so that the cut -off survey can estimate investment which should be compensated for in lieu of expenses (including labour) incurred until the cut - off date.




The establishment of a cut-off date is required to prevent opportunistic invasions /rush migration into the chosen land thereby posing a major risk to the project. Therefore, establishment of the cut-off date is of critical importance.

The local administrative Officer such as the Customary Heads will play a crucial role in identifying users of land since most of them would have acquired their customary rights to use the land from their customary heads.


5.5    Entitlements

The basis of what is to be paid as compensation will be determined by identifying the most appropriate entitlement for each loss based on Bank Policy OP 4.12 and the merit of the option.  An Entitlement Matrix will be establish to set the measure of the payment for all loses or impacts expected from the implementation of the sub-project.  Table 5.3 presents the entitlement matrix for the different categories of loss and other impacts, likely to be encountered on the Sub-projects.

Table 5:3   Entitlement Matrix

Type of impact
Entitled units
Eligibility criteria
Entitlement
LAND
Permanent  acquisition  of land (agricultural, residential, or commercial)
Landowner  (individual,  household or stool)
Own the affected plot in a recognized manner under Liberia law  (which includes ownership under  both  common  and customary laws)
1. Replacement by a piece of land of equivalent agricultural potential located in the vicinity of the affected plot OR Cash compensation at full replacement value if there is substantial evidence that the piece of land taken is not critical to the landowners’ or user’s livelihood. Compensation to be negotiated based on valuation by LVD or certified valuer, taking into account market values for land

2. Disturbance allowance (10%)
Acquisition     of                  easement rights
Landowner  (individual,  household or stool)
Own the affected plot (same as above)
1. Cash compensation of the restriction of use resulting from the easement. Compensation to be negotiated based on valuation by LVD or certified valuer, taking into account market values for land

2. Disturbance allowance (10%)
Temporary   occupation                               of land
Landowner  (individual,  household or stool)
Own the affected plot (same as above)
1. Full reinstatement to pre-Project conditions

2. Rent to be agreed upon for the period during which land is occupied
CROPS
Destruction of standing crops
Landowner or tenant /

sharecropper
Have grown the affected crop (regardless of related plot ownership)
1. Cash compensation for standing crops that cannot be harvested prior to land entry, counted at cut-off date and negotiated based on to Land Valuation Board rates 2.Disturbance allowance (10%)
Damage to crops
Landowner or tenant /

sharecropper
Have grown the affected crop (regardless of plot ownership)
1. Cash compensation for damaged crops counted at cut-off date and negotiated based on Land Valuation Board rates 

2.Disturbance allowance (10%)


Type of impact
Entitled units
Eligibility criteria
Entitlement
STRUCTURES
Destruction of permanent immoveable structures
Owner
Evidence of ownership of the affected structure (regardless of ownership of the plot where the structure is located)
1. Resettlement to a similar dwelling in similar location OR Cash compensation at full replacement value of structure, taking into account market values for structures and materials 2. Cost of moving 3. Disturbance allowance (10%)
Occupant
Live in the affected structure on a permanent

basis (tenant)
1. Cost of moving 2. Disturbance allowance (equal to three

monthly rents)
Temporary displacement of moveable structures
Owner
Own the affected structure (regardless of related plot ownership)
1. Cost of displacing the affected structure 2. Cost of moving the affected structure back to Project-affected land 3. Disturbance allowance (10%)
LIVELIHOODS
Agriculture
Farmer (may be distinct from the affected plot owner)
Use Project affected land for agriculture, regardless of the ownership situation (includes squatters)
1. Cash compensation of any loss of income incurred as a result of the Project, including during the transition period where the farmer is resettled 2. Assistance to livelihood restoration up to pre-Project conditions and related

monitoring
Businesses
Business person (may be distinct from owner of structure where business takes place)
Operate a business on Project affected land, regardless of the land ownership situation (includes squatters)
1. Cash compensation of temporary loss of income incurred because of the Project during the period required to re- establish the business to pre-Project conditions 2. Assistance to livelihood restoration up to pre-Project conditions, if

necessary, and related monitoring
Use of communal resources
User of such resources (can be individuals or communities)
Use communal resources as an element of livelihood
1. Assistance in identifying and accessing similar resources elsewhere 2. Cash compensation of temporary loss of income incurred because of the Project during the period required to

access similar resources elsewhere
Loss of Employment
Worker being redeployed/

Severance
In formal employment of the organization (employer) undergoing changes that will necessitate involuntary resettlement
Redundancy Payment as per prescription of Act 651 (section

65)

Squatters


To be provided  resettlement assistance to a place where they can legally live and work in lieu of compensation for land occupied;

Right to salvage assets;

Assistance with livelihood restoration 


6      GRIEVANCE REDRESS MECHANISMS




6.1    Potential Grievances/ Disputes

Grievances and complaints that arise during the course of implementation of a resettlement and compensation program may be related to the following issues:
  •  Mistakes in inventorying or valuing properties;
  •  Disagreement  on   plot   boundaries,  either   between   the   affected   person   and   the expropriation agency;
  •  Disputed ownership of a given asset (two or more affected people claiming that the affected asset is theirs);
  •  Disagreement on plot/asset valuation; and
  •  Where affected person opt for  a  resettlement-based  option,  disagreement  on  the resettlement package (the location of the resettlement site does not suit them and/ or proposed housing or resettlement plot characteristics are not favourable to them).
6.2    Grievance Redress Mechanism

6.2.1     Overview

As part of the implementation of the parent project, LACE established a grievance redress mechanism for receiving and addressing project-related grievance and complaints. The GRM incorporates local leadership and utilizes community-level structures to address complaints associated with the project. The GRM as outlined below will apply under the AF. When complainants are dissatisfied with the outcome of the project-level GRM, they can appeal to high courts as prescribed by law. 

STEP 1: Receive and Acknowledge Grievance

This is the entry step of all project-related complaints and grievance. Complainants can lodge their grievance through one of the following;
  1. Collect, fill in, and submit Grievance form (Appendix 2) to Community Facilitators (CFs). The complainant may complete the form or permit the CF or his/her representatives to do so. Completed Grievance forms may be placed into Complaint Boxes stationed at the community hall or handed to CF. It is expected the form will be digitalized to serve as additional avenue for grievance to be lodged.
  2. Call toll free number: 3344 [ managed by GRM officer]
  3. Email: yopcomplaints@gmail.com [managed by GRM officer]
For complaints submitted to CF, the CF will fill, detach, and submit the acknowledgement section of the Grievance form to the complainant. Regardless of the entry step, the GRM officer shall register all complaints in the project’s Grievance Management System. 

County Coordinator (CCs) will collect; scan or hand-deliver completed Grievance Forms to GRM officer weekly.

STEP 2: Assess, Provide Immediate Response or Assign to Appropriate Implementing Partner

Upon receipt of grievance, the GRM officer shall do one of the following;
  1. Assess and provide immediate redress if possible; OR
  2. Where immediate redress is not possible, the officer will determine the category of the complaint (See section 5) and immediately assign it to the appropriate implementing partner (LACE, MYS & MGCSP) for investigation and redress.
When a complaint is assigned to an implementing partner, the GRM officer shall maintain regular contact and coordinate with the partner during the investigation and redress of the said complaint.  

STEP 3: Investigate, Determine and Decide Course of Action

Each implementing partner – MYS, LACE, MGCSP - will dedicate responsibility for investigating and addressing complaints to selected officials, including management and field staff. The selected officials are responsible for investigating and recommending resolutions to complaints that have been assigned to implementing partners.

In the process of investigating grievances, each implementing partner may include or confer with community leaders, county and district officials, county coordinators, county facilitators, service providers, etc. who they deem relevant to cause (of the grievance) or the solution to the grievance. The will enhance credibility and trust for the GRM process.
The process of investigating grievance should consider the following
Understand the grievance; Meet/discuss with complainant to understand his perspectives and motives; Gather facts about the grievance; Determine the merits of the grievance; Decide on possible actions to respond to the grievance; Evaluate the actions taking into consideration implications on cost, reputation, and legacy; and Decide on best possible action to address grievance. 

In investigating the course of actions for redress, consider and analyze the effect of each course of action on the existing and future management policies and procedures before your final decision.  
When the decision is made about possible actions for grievance redress, the implementing partner will communicate back to the GRM officer via email. The email will indicate summary of facts about the grievance and the decision thereof. A record of this email must be maintained in the YOP’s GRM system.

STEP 4: Communicate and Implement Decision

Following the decision on an appropriate mitigation measure, the GRM officer will inform the complainant about the decision. The officer shall communicate the decision using the same medium – phone call, in-person, or email- with which the complaint was transmitted to the project. As a general guidance, the Grievance form may be completed and sent to the complainant. The officer shall inform the complainant about the time within which the decision shall be implemented. 

The GRM officer will exercise oversight and coordinate the implementation of the selected course of action.  The officer is encouraged to follow-up on complainants and to assess feedback and ensure that grievance was resolved completely and adequately.

STEP 5: Grievance Closure

This is the final stage of the grievance redress mechanism. This stage is triggered on the day the decision is implemented. Once the selected course of action is implemented, the complainant is required to sign-off on the complaint indicating that the project has fully addressed his concern and complaint. At closure of the grievance, the GRM officer shall inform the complainant about his rights to recourse beyond the YOP grievance mechanism. Recourse may include the country court systems or the World Bank Grievance Redress Mechanisms.  


As part of the parent project, two training orientation were provided for members of County Oversight Committees (CoCs) in the 129 communities of the project’s implementation at various points and more training is anticipated.

Methods for Reporting and Increasing Visibility

Posters of the GRM structure have been printed and distributed amongst all stakeholders. This is to ensure and enhance visibility as well as increase the GR knowledge of the beneficiaries and all the stakeholders. The poster displays the procedures for redress and the methods for reporting.   

6.3    Appeal to Court

Persons who feel dissatisfied with the outcome of complaints and grievances they submitted to LACE are free to resort to law courts as per the constitution of Liberia. The Court system is the “last resort” option, in view of the first and second level mechanisms. 

7      BUDGET AND FUNDING ARRANGEMENTS

The funding of any expected involuntary resettlement will be borne by the Government of Liberia.  The extent of involuntary resettlement caused by the project is expected to be very limited if occurring at all. A budget of one hundred fifty thousand (150,000) United States Dollars is dedicated to the project to address any involuntary resettlement caused by the project.

7.1    BUDGETING

The three components of budgeting are the implementation of the RPF, preparation of RAP and finally the implementation of RAP.  The implementation of the RPF will involve the following:

Training and awareness creation for stakeholders; and
  •  Logistical support for key stakeholders; and
  •  Preparation of RAP.
The implementation of the RAP will involve addressing all the issues articulated in the RAP and will be borne by the Government of Liberia.

7.2    Funding Sources, Payment Methods and Entitlements


The resettlement support to all affected eligible persons will be for the following:
  •  Transportation assistance to areas of relocation;
  •  Receive food and non-food assistance and accommodation. The food and non- food assistance will be distributed in bulk from centralized distribution points within communities of resettlement
  •  Self- reliant jobs at places of resettlement
7.3    Consultation on Payment Methods

No national legal framework exists for payment. However, LACE shall ensure that the sub-project community is committed to fairness and transparency in any distribution method whereby affected people receive assistance that is channelled through the local authority. LACE will encourage sub-project communities to consult with stakeholders to ensure transparency in the provision of assistance to affected people.  A monitoring and reporting system of the processes will be put in place.

7.4    CONSULTATION AND PARTICIPATION

LACE has carried out extensive stakeholder consultations with Sub-project beneficiaries and NGOs from a representative sample of counties from March 26 to March 31, 2014.  The project beneficiaries generally welcomed the Sub-projects as having a positive impact on their livelihoods.  Annex 5 shows the detailed consultations at the community level.  In addition, the Government stakeholders, particularly the Liberia Environmental Protection Agency (LEPA), also was consulted in regards to the impact of Sub-projects.

The project affected persons (PAPs) will also be consulted during preparation and implementation of RAPS and be involved in all resettlement activities: planning, implementation and monitoring. Their involvement provides them with greater understanding of the project, the resettlement issues and gives them opportunities to voice out their concerns about the project, and they may offer alternatives and compromises that tend to promote implementation.

Mechanism for community entry, consultation and participation of PAPs will be articulated well in the RAPs for the sub-projects and will be defined by cultural prescriptions which will be carefully studied and adhered to in each affected community. The mechanisms will include public meetings, participation in site preparation, resettlement committees for PAPs and communities and interagency committees for participating stakeholders.

Public meetings: meetings with Community leaders, opinion leaders, utility agencies, Assembly men and PAPs as individuals (as during the survey) and in their groups.
At the meeting with the project affected persons, the resettlement team will explain the various options of resettlement so that they can choose what they want; for instance cash compensations, alternative land or building, or group resettlement.

Group resettlement ensures that social networks and community institutions are not disintegrated and is appropriate for projects affecting whole settlements or sites.

PAPs will also be briefed on the compensation/resettlement process and each affected person will be given the chance to air their views on a draft resettlement plan on issues of concern to him or her.

b) Involvement in site preparation
Participation will also be fostered through use of local know-how and materials; the contractor will be encouraged to use local people to supply materials and goods needed for the sub-project implementation.

Group formation: using existing groups or assisting PAPs to form groups provides institutional framework for participatory resettlement
  1. d) Involvement in resettlement committees and monitoring teams: participation in committees would be one of the key mechanisms for involvement of PAPs in the planning, implementation and monitoring of the RAPs.
8      MONITORING AND EVALUATION

Monitoring and evaluation of the sub-project implementation process will be a continuous process and will include internal and external monitoring.

8.1    Internal Monitoring

Internal monitoring of the resettlement/rehabilitation operations will be undertaken by LACE and Local Government Authorities (LGA).

The day-to-day field supervision will be conducted by LACE program staff with regular oversight from LGA, including the County Development Officer, County Engineer and County Agriculture Extension Worker as applicable. Cost of monitoring will be the responsibility of LACE and the GoL.

8.2    External Monitoring

External monitoring will be done by the World Bank, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and relevant NGOs as and when the need arise.

8.3    Completion Audit

An audit will be done to determine whether the efforts to restore the living standards of the affected population have been properly designed and executed.

This completion audit will verify that all physical inputs earmarked in the RAP have been delivered and all services provided. The audit will also evaluate if the mitigation actions prescribed in the RAP have had the desired effect. The baseline conditions of the affected parties before the relocation will be used as a measure against their socio-economic status after the resettlement.

To be effective, the completion audit will take place after all RAP activities have been completed including development initiatives, but before the financial commitments to the program are finished. This will allow the flexibility to undertake any corrective action that the auditors may recommend before the project is completed.

9      INFORMATION DISCLOSURE

LACE will disclose this Resettlement Policy Framework and subsequent RAPs by making copies available at its head office and the County Administrative offices in which the sub-projects are being undertaking. The Government of Liberia will also agree with the World Bank to disclose this RPF electronically through its InfoShop.

Likewise, all RAPs to be prepared under the Sub-projects, will be disclosed by LACE, which will make copies available at its head offices in Monrovia, and make copies available to the local governments authorities and other stakeholders.  The Government of Liberia will also authorize the World Bank to disclose the RAPs electronically through its InfoShop.

10   LIST OF ANNEXES

Annex 1:      World Bank Policy on Involuntary Resettlement (OP 4.12)

Annex 2:      RAP Outline

Annex 3:      Grievance Form (GF)

Annex 4:      Grievance Redress Form (GRF)

Annex 5:      Summary of Safeguard Consultations

Annex 1:

World Bank Policy on Involuntary Resettlement (OP 4.12)

OP 4.12, Annex A - Involuntary Resettlement Instruments

These policies were prepared for use by World Bank staff and are not necessarily a complete treatment of the subject.
  1.  This annex describes the elements of a resettlement plan, an abbreviated resettlement plan, a resettlement policy framework, and a resettlement process framework, as discussed in OP 4.12, paras. 17-31.
 Resettlement Plan
  1.  The scope and level of detail of the resettlement plan vary with the magnitude and complexity of resettlement. The plan is based on up-to-date and reliable information about: (a) the proposed resettlement and its impacts on the d persons and other adversely affected groups, and (b) the legal issues involved in resettlement. The resettlement plan covers the elements below, as relevant. When any element is not relevant to project circumstances, it should be noted in the resettlement plan.
  2.  Description of the project. General description of the project and identification of the project area.
  3.  Potential impacts. Identification of:
(a) the project component or activities that give rise to resettlement;

(b) the zone of impact of such component or activities;

(c) the alternatives considered to avoid or minimize resettlement; and

(d) the mechanisms established to minimize resettlement, to the extent possible,

during project implementation.

Objectives. The main objectives of the resettlement program.
  1. Socioeconomic studies. The findings of socioeconomic studies to be conducted in the early stages of project preparation and with the involvement of potentially d people, including
(a) the results of a census survey covering

(i) current occupants of the affected area to establish a basis for the design of the resettlement program and to exclude subsequent inflows of people from eligibility for compensation and resettlement assistance;

(ii) standard characteristics of d households, including a description of production systems, labor, and household organization; and baseline information on livelihoods (including, as relevant, production levels and income derived from both formal and informal economic activities) and standards of living (including health status) of the d population;

(iii) the magnitude of the expected loss--total or partial--of assets, and the extent of ment, physical or economic;

(iv) information on vulnerable groups or persons as provided for in OP 4.12, para. 8, for whom special provisions may have to be made; and

(v) provisions to update information on the d people's livelihoods and standards of living at regular intervals so that the latest information is available at the time of their ment.

(b) other studies describing the following

(i) land tenure and transfer systems, including an inventory of common property natural resources from which people derive their livelihoods and sustenance, non-title-based usufruct systems (including fishing, grazing, or use of forest areas) governed by local recognized land allocation mechanisms, and any issues raised by different tenure systems in the project area;

(ii) the patterns of social interaction in the affected communities, including social networks and social support systems, and how they will be affected by the project;

(iii) public infrastructure and social services that will be affected; and

(iv) social and cultural characteristics of d communities, including a description of formal and informal institutions (e.g., community organizations, ritual groups, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs)) that may be relevant to the consultation strategy and to designing and implementing the resettlement activities.

Legal framework. The findings of an analysis of the legal framework, covering
(a) the scope of the power of eminent domain and the nature of compensation associated with it, in terms of both the valuation methodology and the timing of payment;

(b) the applicable legal and administrative procedures, including a description of the remedies available to d persons in the judicial process and the normal timeframe for such procedures, and any available alternative dispute resolution mechanisms that may be relevant to resettlement under the project;

(c) relevant law (including customary and traditional law) governing land tenure, valuation of assets and losses, compensation, and natural resource usage rights; customary personal law related to ment; and environmental laws and social welfare legislation;

(d) laws and regulations relating to the agencies responsible for implementing resettlement activities;

(e) gaps, if any, between local laws covering eminent domain and resettlement and the Bank's resettlement policy, and the mechanisms to bridge such gaps; and

(f) any legal steps necessary to ensure the effective implementation of resettlement activities under the project, including, as appropriate, a process for recognizing claims to legal rights to land--including claims that derive from customary law and traditional usage (see OP 4.12, para.15

b).
Institutional Framework. The findings of an analysis of the institutional framework covering
(a) the identification of agencies responsible for resettlement activities and NGOs that may have a role in project implementation;

(b) an assessment of the institutional capacity of such agencies and NGOs; and

(c) any steps that are proposed to enhance the institutional capacity of agencies and NGOs responsible for resettlement implementation.


  1.  Eligibility. Definition of d persons and criteria for determining their eligibility for compensation and other resettlement assistance, including relevant cut-off dates.
  2.  Valuation of and compensation for losses. The methodology to be used in valuing losses to determine their replacement cost; and a description of the proposed types and levels of compensation under local law and such supplementary measures as are necessary to achieve replacement cost for lost assets.1
  3.  Resettlement measures. A description of the packages of compensation and other resettlement measures that will assist each category of eligible d persons to achieve the objectives of the policy (see OP 4.12, para. 6). In addition to being technically and economically feasible, the resettlement packages should be compatible with the cultural preferences of the d persons, and prepared in consultation with them.
  4.  Site selection, site preparation, and relocation. Alternative relocation sites considered and explanation of those selected, covering
(a) institutional and technical arrangements for identifying and preparing relocation sites, whether rural or urban, for which a combination of productive potential, locational advantages, and other factors is at least comparable to the advantages of the old sites, with an estimate of the time needed to acquire and transfer land and ancillary resources;

(b) any measures necessary to prevent land speculation or influx of ineligible persons at the selected sites;

(c) procedures for physical relocation under the project, including timetables for site preparation and transfer; and

(d) legal arrangements for regularizing tenure and transferring titles to resettlers.


  1.  Housing, infrastructure, and social services. Plans to provide (or to finance resettlers' provision of) housing, infrastructure (e.g., water supply, feeder roads), and social services (e.g., schools, health services);2plans to ensure comparable services to host populations; any necessary site development, engineering, and architectural designs for these facilities.
  2.  Environmental protection and management. A description of the boundaries of the relocation area; and an assessment of the environmental impacts of the proposed resettlement3and measures to mitigate and manage these impacts (coordinated as appropriate with the environmental assessment of the main investment requiring the resettlement).
  3. Community participation. Involvement of resettlers and host communities,4
(a) a description of the strategy for consultation with and participation of resettlers and hosts in the design and implementation of the resettlement activities;

(b) a summary of the views expressed and how these views were taken into account in preparing the resettlement plan;

(c) a review of the resettlement alternatives presented and the choices made by d persons regarding options available to them, including choices related to forms of compensation and resettlement assistance, to relocating as individuals families or as parts of pre-existing communities or kinship groups, to sustaining existing patterns of group organization, and to retaining access to cultural property (e.g. places of worship, pilgrimage centers, cemeteries);5and

(d) institutionalized arrangements by which d people can communicate their concerns to project authorities throughout planning and implementation, and measures to ensure that such vulnerable groups as indigenous people, ethnic minorities, the landless, and women are adequately represented.

 Integration with host populations. Measures to mitigate the impact of resettlement on any host communities, including
(a) consultations with host communities and local governments;

(b) arrangements for prompt tendering of any payment due the hosts for land or other assets provided to resettlers;

(c) arrangements for addressing any conflict that may arise between resettlers and host communities; and

(d) any measures necessary to augment services (e.g., education, water, health, and production services) in host communities to make them at least comparable to services available to resettlers.

Grievance procedures. Affordable and accessible procedures for third-party settlement of disputes arising from resettlement; such grievance mechanisms should take into account the availability of judicial recourse and community and traditional dispute settlement mechanisms.
  1. Organizational responsibilities. The organizational framework for implementing resettlement, including identification of agencies responsible for delivery of resettlement measures and provision of services; arrangements to ensure appropriate coordination between agencies and jurisdictions involved in implementation; and any measures (including technical assistance) needed to strengthen the implementing agencies' capacity to design and carry out resettlement activities; provisions for the transfer to local authorities or resettlers themselves of responsibility for managing facilities and services provided under the project and for transferring other such responsibilities from the resettlement implementing agencies, when appropriate.
  2.  Implementation schedule. An implementation schedule covering all resettlement activities from preparation through implementation, including target dates for the achievement of expected benefits to resettle and hosts and terminating the various forms of assistance. The schedule should indicate how the resettlement activities are linked to the implementation of the overall project.
  3.  Costs and budget. Tables showing itemized cost estimates for all resettlement activities, including allowances for inflation, population growth, and other contingencies; timetables for expenditures; sources of funds; and arrangements for timely flow of funds, and funding for resettlement, if any, in areas outside the jurisdiction of the implementing agencies.
  4.  Monitoring and evaluation. Arrangements for monitoring of resettlement activities by the implementing agency, supplemented by independent monitors as considered appropriate by the Bank, to ensure complete and objective information; performance monitoring indicators to measure inputs, outputs, and outcomes for resettlement activities; involvement of the d persons in the monitoring process; evaluation of the impact of resettlement for a reasonable period after all resettlement and related development activities have been completed; using the results of resettlement monitoring to guide subsequent implementation.
 Abbreviated Resettlement Plan
  1.  An abbreviated plan covers the following minimum elements:6
(a) a census survey of d persons and valuation of assets;

(b) description of compensation and other resettlement assistance to be provided;

(c) consultations with d people about acceptable alternatives;

(d) institutional responsibility for implementation and procedures for grievance redress;

(e) arrangements for monitoring and implementation; and

(f) a timetable and budget.

 Resettlement Policy Framework
  1.  The purpose of the policy framework is to clarify resettlement principles, organizational arrangements, and design criteria to be applied to subprojects to be prepared during project implementation (see OP 4.12, paras. 26-28). Subproject resettlement plans consistent with the policy framework subsequently are submitted to the Bank for approval after specific planning information becomes available (see OP 4.12, para. 29).
  2.  The resettlement policy framework covers the following elements, consistent with the provisions described in OP 4.12, paras. 2 and 4:
(a) a brief description of the project and components for which land acquisition and resettlement are required, and an explanation of why a resettlement plan as described in paras.

2-21 or an abbreviated plan as described in para. 22 cannot be prepared by project appraisal;

(b) principles and objectives governing resettlement preparation and implementation;

(c) a description of the process for preparing and approving resettlement plans;

(d) estimated population ment and likely categories of d persons, to the extent feasible;

(e) eligibility criteria for defining various categories of d persons;

(f) a legal framework reviewing the fit between borrower laws and regulations and Bank policy requirements and measures proposed to bridge any gaps between them;

(g) methods of valuing affected assets;

(h) organizational procedures for delivery of entitlements, including, for projects involving private sector intermediaries, the responsibilities of the financial intermediary, the government, and the private developer;

(i) a description of the implementation process, linking resettlement implementation to civil works;

(j) a description of grievance redress mechanisms;

(k) a description of the arrangements for funding resettlement, including the preparation and review of cost estimates, the flow of funds, and contingency arrangements;

(l) a description of mechanisms for consultations with, and participation of, d persons in planning, implementation, and monitoring; and

(m) arrangements for monitoring by the implementing agency and, if required, by independent monitors.
  1.  When a resettlement policy framework is the only document that needs to be submitted as a condition of the loan, the resettlement plan to be submitted as a condition of subproject financing need not include the policy principles, entitlements, and eligibility criteria, organizational arrangements, arrangements for monitoring and evaluation, the framework for participation, and mechanisms for grievance redress set forth in the resettlement policy framework. The subproject-specific resettlement plan needs to include baseline census and socioeconomic survey information; specific compensation rates and standards; policy entitlements related to any additional impacts identified through the census or survey; description of resettlement sites and programs for improvement or restoration of livelihoods and standards of living; implementation schedule for resettlement activities; and detailed cost estimate.
Process Framework
  1.  A process framework is prepared when Bank-supported projects may cause restrictions in access to natural resources in legally designated parks and protected areas. The purpose of the process framework is to establish a process by which members of potentially affected communities participate in design of project components, determination of measures necessary to achieve resettlement policy objectives, and implementation and monitoring of relevant project activities (see OP 4.12, paras. 7 and 31).
  2.  Specifically, the process framework describes participatory processes by which the following activities will be accomplished
(a) Project components will be prepared and implemented. The document should briefly describe the project and components or activities that may involve new or more stringent restrictions on natural resource use. It should also describe the process by which potentially d persons participate in project design.

(b) Criteria for eligibility of affected persons will be determined. The document should establish that potentially affected communities will be involved in identifying any adverse impacts, assessing of the significance of impacts, and establishing of the criteria for eligibility for any mitigating or compensating measures necessary.

(c) Measures to assist affected persons in their efforts to improve their livelihoods or restore them, in real terms, to pre-ment levels, while maintaining the sustainability of the park or protected area will be identified. The document should describe methods and procedures by which communities will identify and choose potential mitigating or compensating measures to be provided to those adversely affected, and procedures by which adversely affected community members will decide among the options available to them.

(d) Potential conflicts or grievances within or between affected communities will be resolved. The document should describe the process for resolving disputes relating to resource use restrictions that may arise between or among affected communities, and grievances that may arise from members of communities who are dissatisfied with the eligibility criteria, community planning

measures, or actual implementation.

Additionally, the process framework should describe arrangements relating to the following

(e) Administrative and legal procedures. The document should review agreements reached regarding the process approach with relevant administrative jurisdictions and line ministries (including clear delineation for administrative and financial responsibilities under the project).

(f) Monitoring arrangements. The document should review arrangements for participatory monitoring of project activities as they relate to (beneficial and adverse) impacts on persons within the project impact area, and for monitoring the effectiveness of measures taken to improve (or at minimum restore) incomes and living standards.

  1.  With regard to land and structures, "replacement cost" is defined as follows: For agricultural land, it is the pre-project or pre-ment, whichever is higher, market value of land of equal productive potential or use located in the vicinity of the affected land, plus the cost of preparing the land to levels similar to those of the affected land, plus the cost of any registration and transfer taxes. For land in urban areas, it is the pre-ment market value of land of equal size and use, with similar or improved public infrastructure facilities and services and located in the vicinity of the affected land, plus the cost of any registration and transfer taxes. For houses and other structures, it is the market cost of the materials to build a replacement structure with an area and quality similar to or better than those of the affected structure, or to repair a partially affected structure, plus the cost of transporting building materials to the construction site, plus the cost of any labor and contractors' fees, plus the cost of any registration and transfer taxes. In determining the replacement cost, depreciation of the asset and the value of salvage materials are not taken into account, nor is the value of benefits to be derived from the project deducted from the valuation of an affected asset. Where domestic law does not meet the standard of compensation at full replacement cost, compensation under domestic law is supplemented by additional measures so as to meet the replacement cost standard. Such additional assistance is distinct from resettlement measures to be provided under other clauses in
  2.  Provision of health care services, particularly for pregnant women, infants, and the elderly, may be important during and after relocation to prevent increases in morbidity and mortality due to malnutrition, the psychological stress of being uprooted, and the increased risk of disease.
  3.  Negative impacts that should be anticipated and mitigated include, for rural resettlement, deforestation, overgrazing, soil erosion, sanitation, and pollution; for urban resettlement, projects should address such density-related issues as transportation capacity and access to potable water, sanitation systems, and health facilities.
  4.  Experience has shown that local NGOs often provide valuable assistance and ensure viable community participation.
  5.  OP 4.11, Physical Cultural Resources.
  6.  In case some of the d persons lose more than 10% of their productive assets or require physical relocation, the plan also covers a socioeconomic survey and income restoration measures.
Annex 2:

RAP Outline

OUTLINE OF A RESETTLEMENT ACTION PLAN

Reference: OP 4.12, Annex A.

1. Description of the sub-project and of its potential land impacts
1.1       General description of the project and identification of the project area

1.2       Potential impacts.           Identification of

1.2.1   the project component or activities that give rise to resettlement;

1.2.2   the zone of impact of such component or activities;

1.2.3   the alternatives considered to avoid or minimize resettlement; and

1.2.4   the mechanisms established to  minimize resettlement, to  the extent possible, during project implementation.
  1.  Objectives. The main objectives of the resettlement program.
  2.  Socio-economic studies and census of affected assets and affected livelihoods.  The findings of socio-economic studies and census to be conducted with the involvement of potentially displaced people, include:
3.1 the results of a census survey covering current occupants of the affected area to establish a

basis for the design of the resettlement program and to exclude subsequent inflows of people from eligibility for compensation and resettlement assistance;

3.2 standard characteristics of displaced households, including a description of production systems, labour, and household organization; and baseline information on livelihoods (including, as relevant, production levels and income derived from both formal and informal economic activities) and standards of living (including health status) of the displaced population;

3.3 the   magnitude  of   the   expected   loss—total  or   partial—of  assets,   and   the   extent   of displacement, physical or economic;

3.4 information on vulnerable groups or persons as provided for in OP 4.12, para. 8, for whom special provisions may have to be made;

3.5 provisions to update information on the displaced people's livelihoods and standards of living

at regular intervals so that the latest information is available at the time of their displacement.

3.6 Other studies describing the following

3.6.1    land tenure and transfer systems, including an inventory of common property natural resources from which people derive their livelihoods and sustenance, non-title-based usufruct systems (including fishing, grazing, or use of forest areas) governed by local recognized land allocation mechanisms, and any issues raised by different tenure systems in the project area;

3.6.2    the  patterns  of  social  interaction  in  the  affected  communities,  including  social networks and social support systems, and how they will be affected by the project;

3.6.3    public infrastructure and social services that will be affected; and

3.6.4    social and cultural characteristics of displaced communities, including a description of formal and informal institutions (e.g., community organizations, ritual groups, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs)) that may be relevant to the consultation strategy and to designing and implementing the resettlement activities.
  1.  Legal and Institutional Framework.
4.1       Summary of the information included in this RPF

4.2       Local legal specificities if any

4.3       Local institutional specificities

4.3.1    identification of agencies locally responsible for resettlement activities and NGOs that may have a role in project implementation;

4.3.2    assessment of the institutional capacity of such agencies and NGOs; and
  1.  Eligibility and entitlements. Based on the definitions and categorization in this RPF (see entitlement matrix), definition of displaced persons and criteria for determining their eligibility for compensation and other resettlement assistance, including relevant cut-off dates.
  2.  Valuation of and compensation for losses. The methodology to  be  used  in  valuing  losses  to determine their replacement cost; and a description of the proposed types and levels of compensation under local law and such supplementary measures as are necessary to achieve replacement cost for lost assets.
  3.  Resettlement measures:
7.1       Description of the packages of compensation and other resettlement measures that will assist each category of eligible displaced persons to achieve the objectives of the policy (see OP 4.12, para. 6).

7.2       Site selection, site preparation, and relocation. Alternative relocation sites considered and explanation of those selected.

7.3       Legal arrangements for regularizing tenure and transferring titles to resettlers.

7.4       Housing, infrastructure, and social services.

7.5       Environmental protection and management.

7.6       Community participation. Involvement of resettlers and host communities

7.7       Integration with host populations. Measures to mitigate the impact of resettlement on any host communities

7.8       Specific assistance measures intended for vulnerable people, to be identified for instance amongst those listed in section 9 of the RPF
  1.  Grievance procedures. Based on the principle mechanisms described in this RPF, description of affordable and accessible procedures for third-party settlement of disputes arising from resettlement; such grievance mechanisms should take into account the availability of judicial recourse and community and traditional dispute settlement mechanisms.
  2.  Organizational responsibilities. The  organizational  framework  for  implementing  resettlement, including identification of agencies responsible for delivery of resettlement measures and provision of services; arrangements to ensure appropriate coordination between agencies and jurisdictions involved in implementation; and any measures (including technical assistance) needed to strengthen the implementing agencies'capacity to design and carry out resettlement activities; provisions for the transfer to local authorities or resettlers themselves of responsibility for managing facilities and services provided under the project and for transferring other such responsibilities from the resettlement implementing agencies, when appropriate.
  3.  Implementation schedule. Based on the template presented in the RPF, present an implementation schedule covering all resettlement activities from preparation through implementation, including target dates for the achievement of expected benefits to resettlers and hosts and terminating the various forms of assistance. The schedule should indicate how the resettlement activities are linked to the implementation of the overall project.
  4.  Costs and budget. Tables showing itemized cost estimates for all resettlement activities (see Section
13 of this RPF), including special assistance to vulnerable persons and other contingencies.
  1.  Monitoring and evaluation. Arrangements for  monitoring  of  resettlement  activities  by   the implementing agency, supplemented by independent monitors as considered appropriate by the Bank, to ensure complete and objective information; performance monitoring indicators to measure inputs, outputs, and outcomes for resettlement activities; involvement of the displaced persons in the monitoring process; evaluation of the impact of resettlement for a reasonable period after all resettlement and related development activities have been completed; using the results of resettlement monitoring to guide subsequent implementation.
Annex 3:

Sample Grievance Form

 
GRIEVANCE FORM
Grievance Number

Copes to forward to:

Name of Recorder

(Original) –Receiver Party

County/District/Settlement

(Copy) – Responsible Party

Date



INFORMATION ABOUT GRIEVANCE
Define the Grievance

Name – Surname

Forms of

Receipt

Telephone no

Phone line

Address



Village/Settlement



Community

Information

District/Province

Informal

Signature of Complainant

Other

DETAILS OF GRIEVANCE
1. Access to Land

and Resources


2. Damage to
3. Damage to

infrastructure or

community Assets
4. Decrease or

Loss of

Livelihood
5. Traffic

Accident


a) Lands

b) Fishing Grounds

c) Pasture Land

d) House

e) Commercial site

f) Others


a) Land

b) house

c) livestock

d) Means of

Livelihoods

e) Other


a) Roads/Railway

b) Power/Telephone

lines

c) Water sources,

canals and water

infrastructure for

irrigation and

animals

d) Drinking water

e) Sewage System

f) Other
a) Agriculture

b)Animal

Husbandry

c) Beekeeping

d) Small scale

trade

e) Other


a) Injury

b) Damage to

property

c) Damage to

livestock

d) Other


6.Incidents

Regarding

Expropriation

And compensation

(specify)
7. Resettlement

Process

(Specify)


8.Employment and

Recruitment

(Specify)


9. Construction

Camp and

Community

Relations


10. Other

(Specify)





a)Nuisance from

dust

b) Nuisance

from noise

c) Vibration due

to explosion

d) Misconduct

of the project

personal/worker

e) Complaint

follow-up

f) Other

Annex 4:

Grievance Redress Form (GRF)

-GRIEVANCE REDRESS FORM-

Name (Filer of Complaint): ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 

ID Number (PAPs ID number): ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 

Contact Information (house number/ mobile phone) :………………………………………………………

Nature of Grievance or Complaint: ………………………………………………….…………………….

Date                                        Individuals Contacted                          
Summary of Discussion

Signature………………………………………                                                
Date: ……………………………………………… Signed (Filer of Complaint): …………………………………………………………………………………………………............. Name of Person Filing Complaint (if different from Filer): …………………………..…………………………………... Position or Relationship to Filer: ……………………………………………………………………………………………………..Review/Resolution

Date of Conciliation Session: …………………………………………………………………………………… 

Was Filer Present?:                                                                          Yes                         No 

Was field verification of complaint conducted?                          Yes                         No

Findings of field investigation:……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Summary of Conciliation 

Session Discussion…………………………………………………………………………………. 

Issues………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Was agreement reached on the issues?                                        Yes                         No

If agreement was reached, detail the agreement below:

If agreement was not reached, specify the points of disagreement below:

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………


Signed (Conciliator): ………………………………………….       Signed (Filer): ………………………………………………..

Signed: ………………………………………………………………

(Independent Observer)

Date: …………………………………………………………………….


Annex 5

Summary of Safeguard Consultations

Introduction/Background
LACE prepared an Environmental and Social Management Framework (ESMF) and a Resettlement Policy Framework (RPF) which was approved for the parent YES Project by the Bank in January 2007.  LACE has again updated the RPF and ESMP to cater for the ACGF additional financing of the YOP Project under Component 1 Community Livelihoods which is targeting an additional 9,000 Liberians across the 15 counties of Liberia. 

The purpose of the public consultations was to gather first-hand environmental and social information from all stakeholders especially project beneficiaries and local leaders pertaining to past YES Sub-projects, as well as the additional funding of proposed agro-projects.  The other objective was to identify, record and analyze the useful concerns, claims and grievances from community members relating to impacts (negative or positive) experienced during and after the implementation of sub-projects within their respective communities which will be used to update the existing safeguard instruments (including the ESMF and RPF) of LACE. 

Stakeholder consultations were carried out from March 26-31, 2014 to selected Counties and Project Communities to engage with Project Beneficiaries by a joint team from the Bank represented by Felix Nii Tettey Oku, Senior Environmental Safeguards Specialist and the LACE team lead by Koffa Chie, Monitoring & Evaluation Specialist.  The other LACE team members were Lamin G. Kamara Jr., Project Engineer, and Abraham G. Bah, Vehicle operator.

The selected Counties visited include Bomi, Montserado and Bong Counties.   The Counties visited were however constrained due to the news of an outbreak of the Ebola virus in parts of Liberia.  The mission schedule is shown in the Table below.

Field Observations 
The community meetings were well attended and participatory in nature with equal opportunities given for both men and women to speak their minds in all the communities visited.

The Gbondoi community meeting in Montserrado County had a total number of 61 persons participating.  The participation at Kolila Community in Bong was about 28 persons and the participation in Zeansue Town in Bong was 53 persons.  At Memmeh Town in Montserrado County there was a total of number of 58 persons participating in the meeting.  At Tubman Burg City in Bomi County there were 96 participants in attendance.  At the Klay Community in Klay District and in the Bomi County there were 51 participants in attendance.


Summary of Concerns and Issues

Generally there were no negative issues raised by the participants during the consultation process.

The key concerns and issues raised by the participants included the following:
  •  WATSAN and road side brushing helped to develop their community
  •  According to the District Clark, the project benefited the entire community in one way or another. He further stated that the project uplifted the community and improved the livelihood of its residents
  •  A male participant informed the mission that he appreciated the World Bank efforts through LACE for her continuous support to Liberia. The project has empowered the community members in establishing mini businesses and has reduced the crime rate in the community.
  •  The field supervisor of Equip Youth (CF) said that the project was very helpful to the people of Tubman Burg. According to him the project positively impacted the lives of the people of Bomi; as a result of the project you can see mini businesses established ever where around the city.
  •  He used his pay from the project to pay his children’s school fees and established a business.
  •  A male participant informed the mission that the project positively impacted the community; it helped clean the community and improved their lives.
  •  A female participant informed the mission that her money was used to pay her husband’s hospital bill and portion on her children’s feeding.
  •  A female participant informed the mission that she used her money from the project to renovate her house and pay her children’s school fees.
  •  A male participant informed the mission that he used his pay to attend a trade school and was able to obtain a certificate as a trained mason.
  •  The acting Paramount Chief said that the project was very helpful to the people of Memmeh Town. According to him the project positively impacted the lives of his people. So he hoped for more to come. His gratitude goes to the World Bank and LACE.
Detailed consultations from the community participants, Picture Gallery of Stakeholders Consultation and a sample of the scanned list of participants are presented below.

Bomi County, Klay District- March 26, 2014
No.
Name
Positive impact
Negative impact
Recommendation

1
Theresa Nagomo
She said that the project helped her and her entire family.  Her pay was used to do business.
There was no negative impact experienced.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
2
Edwin B.G Kpagba
According to the District Clark, the project benefited the entire community one way or another. He further stated that the project uplifted the community and improved the livelihood of its residents.
There was no negative impact experienced.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
3
James S. Martin
He used his pay from the project to pay his children’s school fees.
There was no negative impact experienced.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
4
Meima Boakai
According to her, she is a single mother, so the project was a great help to her. She used her money from the project to take care of her and her children.

World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
5
Daniel Colman
He said the project was helpful to the community and that he commended the World Bank and LACE for the past projects.
There was no negative impact experienced.
He recommended that onwards project should be sustainable and long lasting at least 6-months.
6
Noah Jackson
He said the project helped his mother in-law to roof her building.
There was no negative impact experienced.

7
James K. Sirleaf
The WATSAN and road side brushing helped to develop their community.
There was no negative impact experienced.

8
Sheku J. Johnson
The project was good. It helped their community to generate fast money.
There was no negative impact experienced.
He recommended that onwards project be spread out in every community.
9.
Alfred B.S Zinneh
He appreciated the World Bank efforts through LACE for her continuous support to Liberia. The project has empowered the community members in establishing mini businesses and has reduced the crime rates in the community.
He said that the community selection process was a serious problem on the ground that you have more needed community and fewer projects.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
10
Bah Taylor
He said that the project made people  become independent.

World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
11
George Coleman
He said that the project was good and helpful.
For him, time was what he saw as a negative impact on the project.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
12
Charles D. Kanley
He used his money to start his agriculture project and he’s now producing crops and selling.
Experienced no negative impact.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
13
Famata Sirleaf
She said that her money was used to buy Zinc for her new house.
Experienced no negative impact.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
  1.  Bomi County, Tubmanburg City Meeting Minutes- March 26, 2014
No.
Name 
Positive impact
Negative impact
Recommendation
1
Same Cole
The field supervisor of Equip Youth (CF) said that the project was very helpful to the people of Tubman Burg. According to him the project positively impacted the lives of the people of Bomi; as a result of the project you can see mini businesses established ever where around the city.
There was no negative impact experienced.
World Bank should bring back similar project in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
2
Vashtr E. Seh
She expressed many thanks and appreciation to the World Bank and the LACE family. According to her the project helped them get their own businesses running and enabled them pay their children’s school fees.
There was no negative impact experienced.
We need more funding.
3
Mayamu Fofana
She said that the pay from the project was used to settle her rent.
There was no negative impact experienced.
World Bank should bring back similar project in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
4
Varney Konneh
He said beneficiaries benefited from the past project in upholding the livelihood of their families.
There was no negative impact experienced.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
5
Cather Johnson
He said that he used his money from the project to build himself academically.
There was no negative impact experienced.
We need more funding.
6
Musu Varney
She will use her money to support her children.
There was no negative impact experienced.
We need more funding.
7
Tenneh Johnson
As a single Mother, she used her money to pay her four children’s school fees.
There was no negative impact experienced.
We need more funding.
8
Catherine Washgtson
Said that her husband is dead, so she will take opportunity of this project to re-establish the livelihood of herself and her children.
There was no negative impact experienced.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
9.
Fatu Varey
She said that her money was used to buy one plot of land and also applied portion to educate her children.
There was no negative impact experienced.
We need more funding.
  •  Montserrado County, Memmeh Town Meeting Minutes- March 27, 2014
No.
Name
Positive impact
Negative impact
Recommendation
1
K. Moley Morris
He used his pay from the project to pay his children’s school fees and established a business.
No negative experienced.
We need similar projects to improve our living condition.
2
James Dunneh
He said that the project positively impacted the community; it helped clean the community and improved their lives.
No negative impact experienced.
We need similar projects to improve our living condition.
3
Meima Kawah
She has a current business running as a result of the project.
No negative impact experienced.
Similar projects should resuscitate in order to improve our lives.
4
Kornieh Kebbeh
According to her, her grandson acquired land and noted that the entire community benefited from the project.
No negative impact experienced.
Similar projects should resuscitate in order to improve our lives.
5
Fata Peter
According her, her money was used to pay her husband’s hospital bill and portion on her children’s feeding.
No negative impact experienced.
Similar projects should resuscitate in order to improve our lives.
6
Gebbah  M.  Sayon
He said the project helped his mother in-law to roof her building.
No negative impact experienced.
Similar projects should resuscitate in order to improve our lives.
7
Baindu P. Sheriff
She said that she used her money from the project to renovate her house and paid her children’s school fees.
No negative impact experienced.
Similar projects should resuscitate in order to improve our lives.
8
Hawah Dukley
She said that she used her money to make business and paid her children’s school fees.
No negative impact experienced.
Similar projects should resuscitate in order to improve our lives.
9.
Meima Morris
She used her money to pay her husband’s medical bills, children’s school fees and renovate her house.
No negative impact experienced.
Similar projects should resuscitate in order to improve our lives.
10
Momo Kamara
According to him he used his pay to establish/attend a trade school and was able to obtain a certificate as a trained mason.
No negative impact experienced.
Similar projects should resuscitate in order to improve our lives.
11
Karmo V. Dukley
His pay was used to take care of his son’s medical bills.
No negative impact experienced.
Similar projects should resuscitate in order to improve our lives.
12
Konneh David
He used his money to do agriculture and he is now producing crops and selling.
No negative impact experienced.
Similar projects should resuscitate in order to improve our lives.
13
Meima Sayon
She used her money to pay her school fees and a portion to do business.
No negative impact experienced.
Similar projects should resuscitate in order to improve our lives.
14
Jenneh Dorley
She used her money for business.
No negative impact experienced.
Similar projects should resuscitate in order to improve our lives.
15
Toniah Thomas
She said that she used her money to make business and paid her son’s school fees.
No negative impact experienced.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
16
Memmeh Dukley
The acting Paramount Chief said that the project was very helpful to the people of Memmeh Town. According to him the project positively impacted the lives of his people. So he hoped for more to come. His gratitude goes to the World Bank and LACE.
No negative impact experienced.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
  1.  Montserrado County, Gbondoi Meeting Minutes- March 27, 2014
No.
Name
Positive impact
Negative impact
Recommendation
1
J. Boakai Musa

Acting Paramount Chief
He said that most people benefited from the project and were engaged in petty businesses. His sister also used her money to buy zinc for her house.
No negative impact experienced.
World Bank should bring back similar projects.
2
Yammah Boakai
She used her money to start palm oil business.
No negative impact experienced.
We want Community works project back in our community.
3
Amadu Dulley, Dean of Elders
The project helped him and his entire family, they are now into agriculture (pin apple farm).
No negative impact experienced.
LACE should convince World bank for more money to do similar projects in the future.
4
Fatu A. Sarnor
The project helped him and his children to get their daily bread.
No negative impact experienced.
The project helped improved our lives, so we want it to continue.
5
Lamin V. Sarnor
According to him the project helped to link his village to other villages through manual road construction.
No negative impact experienced.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improveour livelihood.
6
Musu Sonie
She said that she used her money to make business.
No negative impact experienced.
We want Community works project back in our community.
7
Meima Konneh
She said that she used her money from the project to do business and paid her children’s school fees.
No negative impact experienced.
We need similar projects to improve our living condition
8
Baindu Swary
She said that the project elevated her from mat to mattress and helped her son to go to school.
No negative  impact experienced.
We need similar projects that will put money in our pockets.
9.
Prince  N. Karduan
He used his money on paying school fees for himself and his sister.
No negative  impact experienced
We want Community works project back in our community.
10
Samuel Kamara
According to him, he used his money to pay hospital bills for himself and his daughter.
No negative impact experienced.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
11
Baindu Bality
She established a business with her money received as compensation.
No negative impact experienced.
We need similar projects to improve our living condition.
12
Musu  Kamara (household member)
Money received by her daughter helped the family with food when she got her compensation.
No negative impact experienced.
We want projects that will make us get more money to support ourselves.
13
Matenneh Konneh
She indirectly benefited from family members who were involved with the project.
No negative impact experienced.
We want Community works project back in our community.
14
Musu Fofana
She used her money to buy zinc for her house.
No negative impact experienced.
The project helped me to get a new dwelling place, so we need it back in our community.
15
Hawah P. Sheriff
She used her money for business purpose.
No negative impact experienced.
The project helped to improve my life, so I want to see it back in our community.
16
Faleku Konneh
He said that two of his sons sat for University of Liberia entrance exam from the money received, and still doing business with the remaining sum.
No negative impact experienced.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
17
Boakai A. Fofana
He invested his money in agricultural production.
No negative impact experienced.
The project helped me to get more money through my agro-business, so I need it back.
  1.  Bong County, Kolila Town Meeting Minutes- March 31, 2014
No.
Name
Positive impact
Negative impact
Recommendation
1
Jacob Kamara

( Clan Chief )
He said that the project positively impacted the lives of his people. Beneficiaries were able to pay their children’s school fees, establish small businesses, and pay medical bills and many others.
No negative impact noticed during and after project implementation.
We need similar projects to improve our living condition.
92
Rachard S. Suakollie
He said that the project positively impacted the community; the road connection to other villages was the greatest achievement for our community.
No negative impact noticed during and after project implementation.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
3
Tutugirl Kamara
She said the road connection helped the community people have easy access to the market. She is now doing business and sending her children to school with the little money she got.
No negative impact noticed during and after project implementation.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
4
Fatu Togba
She used her money to pay her school fees and a portion to do business.
No negative impact noticed during and after project implementation.
We need similar projects to improve our living condition.
5
David J. Bull
According to Mr. Bull, he used the money to pay her hospital bill.
No negative impact noticed during and after project implementation.
We need similar projects to improve our living condition.
6
Massa Morris

( Chair Lady )
She said that the road work helped the entire community; it enabled farmers transport their Agricultural products to the local market.
No negative impact noticed during and after project implementation.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
7
Musu Sackie
She said that she used her money from the project to pay her children’s school feel.
No negative impact noticed during and after project implementation.
We want projects in our community that will help us to pay our children’s school fees.
8
Sylvester Kpayea
He said they benefited from the road project by connecting their community to more villages.
No negative impact noticed during and after project implementation.
The project provided road connectivity in our district, so we need similar projects to connect other villages that are yet to be connected.
9.
Tommy Sackie
He said that the road work positively impacted the lives of the people through road connectivity in the chiefdom.
No negative impact noticed during and after project implementation.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
10
Mohammed Mansary
He benefited from his son’s money to feed his family.
No negative impact noticed during and after project implementation.
We need similar projects to improve our living condition.
11
Emmanuel Dekergai
The transportation system has improved from footpath to car road as a result of the project.
No negative impact noticed during and after project implementation.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
  1.  Bong County, Zeansue Town Meeting Minutes- March 31, 2014
No.
Name
Positive 
Negative Impact
Recommendation
1
Garman Sackie
SheImpact paid her son’s school fees and used the remainder of the money to do business.
No negative impact.
I observed that the project helped majority of us to improve our livelihood.
2
Korto Kolleh
She bought zinc for her new house and used the balance money to pay her son school fees.
No negative impact.
We need similar projects in our community to help us pay our children school fees.
3
Amelia Konneh
She is doing business with her money.
No negative impact.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
4
Famata Konneh
She benefited from the project by means of the road connection.
No negative impact.
We need similar projects to improve our living condition.
5
Mary Yeaza
She used her money to pay her school fees and feed herself.
No negative impact.
We need similar projects to improve our living condition.
6
Musu Johnson
Doing business with her money.
No negative impact.
We need similar projects to improve our living condition.
7
Orether Demminy
She bought mattress, paid her hospital bill. She was able to settle some debts and use the remainder for business.
No negative impact.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood
8
Matta Sackie
She bought mattress, paid her hospital bills and doing business with the remainder.
No negative impact.
LACE should convince World bank for more money to do similar projects in the future.
9.
Patient Lavaleh
He said that the road works connected their town to other farming villages, which impacted the lives of the people.
No negative impact.
LACE should convince World bank for more money to do similar projects in the future.
10
Rupher Taplah
According to him, the project built their capacity, and they are now using the tools from the project to do other community related projects.
No negative impact.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
11
Anita Jimmy
She used her money to pay school fees and do business.
No negative impact.
The project is good for us, therefore we want it to come back in our community.
12
Everline Mulbah
Paid her children’s school fees with her money.
No negative impact.
The project enables me to pay my children’s school fees, so I need it back.
13
Rebecca Gbah
Paid her children school fees and doing business with her money.
No negative impact.
World Bank should bring back similar projects in our community to help us improve our livelihood.
Picture Gallery of Stakeholders Consultation

Sample of scanned list of participants

 [1] Out-of-school youth for the purpose of this project refers to youth have dropped from school and those who have completed one level of school and find it difficult to continue.

[2] Dependent on what is feasible in terms of frequency of training sessions the length of training sessions will vary between 3-12months. Consecutive cohorts will be included in this component given the length of the program and the length of this sub-component.

       

Community Validation being carried out at the office of EDUCARE, the Service Provider of the Household Enterprise under the Youth Opportunities Project (YOP)

The Youth Opportunities Project (YOP) continues to make headways in recent times as day 2 of the community validation makes progress. Yesterday at the office of EDUCARE, LACE implementing partner worked with the Community Oversight Committee from Cooper Clinic, Red Light, Soniwein, 72nd, and Clara to validate youth who were recruited for the Household Enterprise Component of the YOP. The validation is intended to select youth who met the poverty score bench mark and also were eligible to participate in the project. The underlining factor here is that, the project should benefit those vulnerable youth who are desperately in need. The project is expected to involve youth in business by providing a sum of US$2,400.00 to a group of 8 vulnerable youth within urban Montserrado. A total of 3,000 youth are expected to benefit over a period of 3 years.

Targeted Participants During Recruitment In Grand Kru County

Targeted Participants During Recruitment In Grand Kru County
Sweet Corn Harvest In Memeh Town, Lower Montserrado County
Sweet Corn Harvest In Memeh Town, Lower Montserrado County
Sweet Corn Harvest In Memeh Town, Lower Montserrado County

Cash for Works Temporary Employment Project (CfWTEP): 

The Liberia Agency for Community Empowerment (LACE) launched the Cash for Works Temporary Employment (CfWTEP) in 2008 with a grant of US$3 million from the World Bank to the Government of Liberia.  The objective was to provide short-term employment for 17,000 vulnerable people over a period of 2 years. The project was intended to put money in the pockets of vulnerable people who experienced financial shock as a result of galloping increase in prices of basic commodities around the world (for Liberia it was mainly food commodities, fuel including kerosene for light in villages and towns).  The increase in prices of food and fuel worsen the food insecurity situation for the most vulnerable people especially in the leeward counties.

The CfWTEP was effectively implemented by LACE and its implementing partners, the local NGOs that worked as Community Facilitators in the various counties. The lesson learned was that though the objective of the project was to smoothing consumption, the participants used their wages (US$120.00) each in a more sustainable manner, i.e. one third of the money was used for human development related concerns (health and education), one-third on investment in household assets and agriculture inputs, while the balance was used for consumption (Assessment by the World Bank, 2010). The project contributed immensely to improving the welfare of the participants, as well as engendered productive activities in the beneficiary communities.

Youth Employment Skills (YES) – Community Works Project

After the successful completion of the CfWTEP, the Community   Works/Youth Employment Skills (YES) Project was designed, planned and built upon the   CfWTEP also funded by the World Bank. The four-year project provided employment opportunity for 47,500 vulnerable youths across the country.

The YES-Community Works Project mainly focused on creating temporary employment for vulnerable Liberians especially poor and youth at risks to increase income opportunities; the project   emphasis was placed on   community-based public   works,   to address   some   of   the immediate   economic   and   social   needs   of   poor   communities.

As part of project activities, beneficiaries under the project received life skills trainings including managing money, appropriate hygiene practices, Skills to start and sustain small business amongst others.

YES-Community Livelihood Investment Project (CLIP):

Shifting completely from the traditional public works sub-project activities, the Community Livelihood Investment Project (CLIP) built on lessons learned under Community Works Project activities and expands its focus on productive activities and livelihood development.

Under the Community Livelihood Investment Project (CLIP), 9,000 vulnerable persons are targeted, 80 percent youth (18-35yrs) and 20 percent others (36yrs and above). The Project was officially launched on January 31, 2015 and became effective in February with a funding of US$3,4 million from the World bank and supported by the Government of Liberia.

The project is currently ongoing and will be closing on June 30, 2016; CLIP is focusing on productive public works mainly agriculture with emphases on food crops production throughout the 15 counties of Liberia.

The Additional Financing supporting CLIP aims to encourage activities across all subprojects to provide community investment in sustainable youth livelihood projects.  Under the Community Livelihood Investment Project, project communities received a community investment package, including wage subsidy trainings, and assorted simple farm- tools and planting materials (seeds and cuttings).

Value addition support in the form of agro-processing machines such Cassava processor and rice miller will be provided for post-harvest activities to two communities with the largest and well maintained farms in each county.  Training   for effective management of these agro-machines will be provided to project beneficiary communities especially the leadership structures and assigned community technicians/operators.

Liberia Youth Employment Project (LYEP)

Consistent with the Agenda for Transformation, in 2012, the Government of Liberia, through the Ministry of Labor and Ministry of Finance, granted to LACE US$600,000.00 to create 2,500 short-term jobs under the Youth Employment Program (YEP). The YEP managed by LACE covered five counties of Montserrado, Grand Cape Mount, Bomi, Margibi and Grand Bassa. These short-term employment opportunities had a major impact on the vulnerable youths; their households and children, in terms of increase in income and environmental enhancement.

Project activities were Community Driven. Communities were responsible for identifying and selecting the types of activities to be implemented.

 

The LYEP focused on secondary road maintenance, especially in the rural areas. Under this module, jobs provided for youth in routine maintenance of existing secondary (feeder) roads (e.g. roads joining farms to markets, villages to towns, etc.). The road maintenance activities will include the following:

Farm to market roads

  • Bush brushing;
  • Rock breaking for the roads rehabilitation;
  • Cleaning and replacement of culverts;
  • Excavation and cleaning of drains along roads;
  • Construction or rehabilitation of small wooded bridges along roads;
  • Construction of walking paths or trails, stairs on steep hill sides, etc.;
  • Planting of trees on public land; and
  • Filling of potholes on roads

 

Also in villages and towns, the youth would undertake the below listed activities:

  • Cleaning and disposal of waste;
  • Drainage clearance;
  • Painting of public buildings (particularly needed after the rainy season);
  • Rehabilitation of recreational spaces (football field);
  • Small rehabilitation of schools, health posts and other community buildings;
  • Planting of trees and other gardening activities; and

CHYOA

The Children and Youth in Africa (CHYAO) pilot project evolved out of the Community Based Enterprise Development (CBED) project in Liberia. CHYAO was a new concept that was piloted and utilized best practices income-generating enterprises while sustainably managing the forest resources and other protected areas such as Lake-Piso .

The CHYAO project provided support for the reintegration of youth affected by violence and conflict by empowering them with vocational-skills training and opportunities to develop productive lives.
It [CHYAO] contributed to the implementation of the new regulations of the Liberian government regarding Community forestry from the rationale that there were numerous youths involved in forest related activities specifically pit-sawing. Though pit-sawing provides youths with some income, there are questions regarding its biophysical sustainability.

PROSPECTS

The PROSPECTS Cash for Works Project is a Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA)-funded Program with the objective to expand access to employment ready youths to temporary employment programs and to improve youth employability. The Cash for Works component of the PROSPECTS program was under a sub-agreement with Mercy Corps.

PROSPECTS focused its intention to support the Government of Liberia’s (GOL) national strategy to maintain and enhance job security. It included a demand public works program by doing temporary employment, targeting the most vulnerable men and women. The main objective of the CfW was to provide income support to employment ready youths in urban areas.

The total project beneficiary workers of 900 persons completed 18,000 man days of works. The workforce completed tasks such as  surface works involving minimum road side clearing/brushing, hoeing and grubbing out roots;  and activities in earth works  including , drainage cleaning, drainage constructions, ditching, slopping  borrowing, loading  loose soil and garbage into wheelbarrow, hauling and unloading ,  filling  potholes , remove bush and grass cuttings etc.

Emergency Food Distribution

In response to the 2014, Ebola Virus Disease outbreak in the country, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), awarded a contract to LACE in October 2014 to cater to Ebola affected communities in Rivercess and Grand Bassa counties, respectively through the distribution of food rations to affected families and communities.

Hence, working along with the County Health Teams and other stakeholders, LACE was able to reach out to 62,029 beneficiaries, representing 33,539 females and 28,490 males, totaling 916.616 metric tons of food distributed. The food distribution project covered 61 towns in the two counties.